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All-Reviews.com Top 50 Songs*:
for the 1st week of October, 2003

*based on airplay at alternative, pop and rock radio stations a cross the nation (reviews by LarryG)

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(songs 1-25)

  1. Chingy-Right Thurr    (down 2 positions)      buy it!
    Apparently Nelly is so huge that even people who kind of sound like him are destined to have hits. Chingy(born Howard Bailey Jr.) is, like Nelly, from St. Louis. The local dialect seems to include a relaxed slur. So where Nelly had Hot In Herre, Chingy has Right Thurr. Right Thurr, like Nelly's music, has a confident, sprawling, repetitive quality. That's basically where the similarity ends. Chingy doesn't have Nelly's unbelievable fast, easy rapping skills or high energy backing. Chingy's mentor is Ludacris, who is the executive producer of Chingy's debut Jackpot CD. Right Thurr has the broad, jokey quality of some of Ludacris' music. Right Thurr is solidly constructed. It's comfortable with a good, steady beat, repeated synth riff and Chingy's easy rap. Chingy has a good time and his joy is infectious. On the verses, he sounds a little like Eminem in a mischievous mode. The downside is that Right Thurr is really repetitious. Nothing happens to keep your attention as the same riff repeats over and over again. Chingy's repeated, mannered enunciation of the title also gets a little tired. Generally, Right Thurr is genial but slight.

  2. Dashboard Confessional-Hands Down    (up 2 positions)      buy it!
    Dashboard Confessional is led by Christopher Carrabba, a singer/songwriter so sensitive that he makes his fellow sincere emo rockers seem brutish in comparison. Carrabba's serious, heartfelt delivery and clean good looks have won him worshipful fans who moon over him and sing along with his every word. Hands Down is from Dashboard Confessional's new A Mark, A Mission, A Brand, A Scar CD. On Hands Down, Carrabba gives his fans what they expect, making it clear how deeply he feels what he says. Hands Down's dynamics are its strong point. Carrabba creates good intensity, mixing up the song's volume and tempo, quietly emphasizing on certain sections and sharing the joy of release by yelling his heart on the chorus. The new CD was produced by modern rock veteran Gil Norton(Pixies, Belly, Foo Fighters). Hands Down is very listenable perky guitar pop that sounds good but the music is fairly routine and anonymous. Hands Down has the stuttering guitar and quiet to loud formula of The Middle and other Jimmy Eat World songs without that band's musical personality. Hands Down does have Carrabba's winning emotional purity. When he doesn't have a catchy tune to anchor it, Carrabba's sincerity can be too intense and a bit boring but Hands Down is heartfelt with good hooks. Hands Down's lyric is appealingly dramatic. Carrabba communicates the rapturous feeling that "this is the best day I can ever remember." Hands Down does a good job of capturing the heightened emotion of youthful romance. Carrabba sings that "my hopes are so high that your kiss might kill me." He willingly puts himself in his lover's hands and revels in how she "kissed me like you meant it."

  3. 311-Creatures    (down 2 positions)      buy it!
    A while ago it seemed that 311, whose biggest hit was 1995's Down, was fading away, making pleasant but predictable and unimportant music. Recently they've shown some staying power, producing decent variations on their stoner ska rock theme. Last year's mellow, blissed out Amber, from their From Chaos CD, was 311's biggest hit in a while. Creatures, from the new Evolver CD, is another likable single that has 311 rocking a little harder than usual. As on their best songs, 311 keep things interesting on Creatures by mixing the band's disparate elements without overemphasizing any of them. Nick Hexum's loose, spacy croon has a smooth charm but on its own it can be vapid. So Creatures combines Hexum's voice with Tim Mahoney's tough, tight guitar. Creatures also has bursts of fun, silly synth effects, S.A. Martinez' concise, effective rap, Chad Sexton's hard, crisp drumming and good, full harmonies. The result is an enjoyable free flow. Creatures never gets stuck. It varies its flavors as it moves inobtrusively from section to section. Creatures isn't particularly great or ambitious but it is an easy, good time. Creatures' lyric is fairly silly. It's about the pros and cons of being energetic and living an exciting life and the fun of going nuts and having a volatile personality.

  4. Jet-Are You Gonna Be My Girl    new to music chart      buy it!
    Jet follow The Vines as a band from Australia making hard hitting rock and roll. Jet differ from The Vines in seeming less ambitious, pretentious and obnoxious. On Are You Gonna Be My Girl, from the Melbourne band's Get Born CD, Jet are a band having a good time. With their hand claps and tambourines, Jet very obviously borrow from rocking mid-60s British bands like Rolling Stones, Faces and The Who but they seem natural rather than studied or showy. Unlike Black Crowes, for instance, Jet don't seem to show off their resemblance to their heroes. Nic Cester and Cam Muncey give Are You Gonna Be My Girl great energy, mixing up a stomping rhythm guitar line with a good, twisty lead. Muncey has plenty of charisma and a strong voice with a good rock and roll edge. He easily holds his own against the guitars' force and the song doesn't flag when he sings on his own while the guitars take break. Are You Gonna Be My Girl encourages comparisons to lots of different songs. Towards the end, the guitars have the "channelling The Stooges" feel of Strokes songs like Last Nite. Are You Gonna Be My Girl doesn't sound original but it is fun and energetic. Are You Gonna Be My Girl has an appropriately simple, retro lyric. Muncey tells a girl that "you look so fine" that "I really wanna make you mine."

  5. Mya-My Love Is Like... Wo    (up 1 position)      buy it!
    My Love Is Like Wo... is from Mya Harrison's Moodring CD. My Love Is Like was cowritten and coproduced by Missy Elliott. My Love Is Like doesn't have the inventiveness and energy of Elliott's hits but it does have those songs' appealing confidence and sensuality. My Love Is Like is one of many R&B songs where a women promises she's going to please her man but it gives the usual idea a nice spin. She knows the guy will be happy with her because she's quite happy with herself. The fun of the song is how Mya's need to satisfy someone else seems less important than how she's satisfied with herself. My Love Is Like's music is unremarkable and a touch light but it's smooth and controlled and nicely matches the lyric's easy assurance. My Love Is Like has a good, simple beat and quietly dramatic piano, string and synth effects. Mya's voice is relaxed when she's on her own and the singing is playful and strong when she harmonizes and trades lines with backup singers.

  6. Jason Mraz-The Remedy    (down 6 positions)      buy it!
    The Remedy made the top 50 last spring thanks mostly to play on adult alternative radio. The Remedy returned to the chart as, not surprisingly, its annoyingly catchy perkiness has been embraced by pop radio. Jason Mraz is a young singer/songwriter who grew in Virginia and established himself playing in San Diego's coffee houses. Mraz' Waiting For My Rocket To Come CD was produced by John Alagia, who worked with Dave Matthews and John Mayer. Mraz wrote The Remedy with The Matrix(Lauren Christy, Graham Edwards and Scott Spock), who wrote Avril Lavigne's hits. The Matrix's gifts for writing catchy, upbeat tunes is evident but The Remedy doesn't measure up to Lavigne's best feisty, idiosyncratic work. Since Mraz is another cocky, glib white guy, the Matthews/Mayer comparison may be more apt but, to be fair to Matthews and Mayer, Mraz is glibber and his music seems less substantial. The Remedy is pleasant and boomer friendly but its relentless cheerfulness is too much. The catchiness of the "I won't worry my life away" chorus is undermined by a shallow slickness worthy of a TV commercial. Mraz does a white hipster rap on the verses of a sort that gave Barenaked Ladies and others hits but has fallen out of favor on the pop charts the last couple years. Mraz' cutesy gots (as in "you gots the poison, I've gots the remedy) make me think that Mraz needs a good ass kicking to wipe that smirk of the song's face. The Remedy's music matches the sunny vocal and lyric with a bouncy bass and guitar and cheap sounding synths.

  7. Ben Harper-Diamonds On The Inside    (unchanged)      buy it!
    I found With My Own Two Hands, the first chart hit from Ben Harper's Diamonds On The Inside's CD, annoying. With My Own Two Hands was an impressive recreation of the Bob Marley sound but it didn't have much distinctive personality and seemed kind of pointless. Diamonds On The Inside's title track is much more comfortable and appealing. Harper's music includes all sorts of different kinds of folk music. He seems comfortable with the country folk of Diamonds On The Inside, which has the genuine, comfortable feel of a song like The Band's The Weight. Harper is a natural charmer but he tries modesty on Diamonds On The Inside, which sounds a little like a restrained version of his Steal My Kisses. Nothing much happens on Diamonds On The Inside but it sounds good. Diamonds On The Inside is anchored by Harper's strong, simple vocal and a solid acoustic guitar line. It builds a bit towards the end with a good, unshowy guitar solo, warm harmonies and a touch of steel guitar but Diamonds On The Inside remains a likably easy ballad with a positive vibe. On Diamonds On The Inside, Harper sings about a girl named Truth who "was a horrible liar", had everything "but couldn't be satisfied." Harper is a little full of himself, advising us to "make sure the fortune that you seek is the fortune you need" but the lyric generally fits Diamonds On The Inside's good feel.

  8. Beyonce featuring Sean Paul-Baby Boy    (up 12 positions)      buy it!
    Beyonce Knowles' impressive streak of huge hits, first with Destiny's Child and now as a solo artist, continues with Baby Boy, the second single from Beyonce's Dangerously In Love CD. Baby Boy has a sound destined to make it a smash but it's not nearly as appealingly as Dangerously In Love's first hit Crazy In Love. On Crazy In Love, Beyonce abandoned her usual cool, controlled persona for a song with a joyful, liberating sound. On Baby Boy, Beyonce reverts to a professional, slightly calculated voice. Scott Storch, who's worked on hits including Christina Aguilera's Fighter, wrote and produced Baby Boy with Beyonce. Baby Boy has a good, slightly exotic sound with eastern guitar sounds and an emphatic synth that adds to the song's excitement. Baby Boy features popular collaborator Sean Paul(I prefer Breathe, his similar but warmer duet with Blu Cantrell). Paul helps increase Baby Boy's intensity with a confident but focused rap that keeps the song moving forward and avoids the silly narcissism that mars some of Paul's work . Beyonce's singing is OK. She has some of the sensuality the lyric requires but she'd be better if she seemed looser and less studied. Baby Boy's lyric is a fairly routine tribute to a guy who she can't stop thinking about who fulfills her fantasies.

  9. Fountains Of Wayne-Stacy's Mom    new to music chart      buy it!
    Fountains Of Wayne released two good, smart pop rock records in the late 90's and seemed destined to a career with a small, devoted following. Thanks to one of the catchiest songs of the year, Fountains Of Wayne has, at least temporarily, made a quick transition from critics' darlings to pop stars. Welcome Interstate Managers is one of the best records of 2003. It's a likable, thoughtful group of rockers and ballads. While the rest of the record is catchy, carefully constructed and often subtle, the sleek, perky and not subtle Stacy's Mom stands out as FOW's most commercially savvy song. On Stacy's Mom, FOW openly embrace The Cars' power chords and shiny keyboards formula. From an opening stuttering guitar riff to beeping synths to a tight, electronic beat that precedes each verse to the delirious wash of synths and big guitars on the chorus, Stacy's Mom keeps coming and building with different, appealing sounds. Jody Porter plays a winning, triumphant guitar solo then the chorus comes back one more time for a big finish with an even more exuberant mix of harmonies, hand claps and keyboards. Singer Chris Collingwood plays straight man to the flamboyant sounds but his vocal has a guilelessness that works with the sincere lyric. Stacy's Mom isn't my favorite FOW song. Especially after hearing it a thousand times, I don't love its glossy perfection as much as the more personal, idiosyncratic feel of other songs. But there's little doubt about Stacy's Mom ingeniousness. Fountains Of Wayne's songs have vivid detail that's rare in pop music. As they do on many of their songs, Collingwood and Adam Schlesinger write on Stacy's Mom about a simpler, youthful time. But the melancholy of many FOW's songs is replaced on Stacy's Mom by the giddiness of depicting the ridiculous, charming overconfidence of a kid sure he can convince his friend's mom that she "could use a guy like me."

  10. Jack Johnson-Wasting Time    (unchanged)      buy it!
    The Horizon Has Been Defeated, the first chart hit from Jack Johnson's On And On CD, was one of the year's more likable singles. The Horizon Has Been Defeated, a wry shot at corporate greed, showed Johnson at his charming best. Horizon's good, reggae inflected music fit Johnson's positive vibe and was a little more substantial than some of Johnson's work. Wasting Time, written by Johnson with drummer Adam Topol and bassist Merlo Podlewski, has an even more overt reggae flavor and an interesting guitar sound. Wasting Time isn't quite as irresistable as Horizon but it is appealing, easy listening. Johnson often walks the line between relaxed and complacent but his music is generally appealing and usually works, at least as background music. Wasting Time's lyric is typical Johnson. He often depicts himself as a stoner with a very laidback but confident approach to women. As on Flake, Wasting Time paints a world of people barely energetic enough to care about anything. Wasting Time has a cutesy theme: "I'm just a waste of her energy and she just wasting my time, so why gon't we get together and we could waste it all tonight."

  11. Pete Yorn-Crystal Village    (up 1 position)      buy it!
    Crystal Village is the second chart hit from Pete Yorn's second CD Day I Forgot. Crystal Village is the best song on the not bad but not great CD. Jeff Buckley is clearly a role model for Yorn. Yorn has often tried to emulate Buckley's intensity and the thrills Buckley was able to produce with dramatic songs that swooped back and forth between quiet and charged. On Crystal Village, Yorn achieves that kind of excitement. Like most of Yorn's best songs, Yorn creates a rich sound playing multiple instruments along with R. Walt Vincent. Crystal Village's music is theatrical but not overdone. Crystal Village builds and adds compelling emotion. It starts out with only a finger picked guitar then adds Yorn's drums, Vincent's string effects and, finally, slashing electric guitar, to epic effect. Yorn's deep, heavy voice can be too much when he doesn't have an interesting song. But on a great song like Crystal Village, Yorn's singing completes a powerful, sweeping sound. Crystal Village is apparently about Yorn trying to resuscitate a relationship that "was good in the beginning" by taking his partner's hand and showing her bright "lights arranging twilight sages."

  12. 50 Cent-P.I.M.P.    (up 3 positions)      buy it!
    P.I.M.P, the third hit from his Get Rich Or Die Tryin' CD, supports the theory that 50 Cent can release anything these days and it'll be a hit. P.I.M.P.'s success was probably aided by 50's flamboyant performance with Snoop Dogg on the Video Music Awards. P.I.M.P. is a slight novelty song but it is appealing. P.I.M.P. rolls along easily on the Caribbean sound of steel drums and a steady, if slightly irritating, scraping beat. 50's rap has even more relaxed charm than usual. His style is very effective. He's fast and confident but his easy, unshowy, slightly mushed mouthed, regular guy delivery make his rap very accessible and likable. On P.I.M.P., 50 Cent is working hard, keeping a seemingly endless string of lines coming, but he's still very much at ease. P.I.M.P.'s whimsical sound disguises the obnoxious nature of the lyrics. P.I.M.P. is apparently about the fact that, when it comes to women, 50 has the cold, bottom line oriented attitude of a pimp. 50 Cent tells us how he can charm the ladies but P.I.M.P. is mostly about how "a bitch can't get a dollar out of me." The third verse has some nasty, pointless details of the pimping business, threatening that if you "put my other hoes down, you get your ass beat" and ordering his girls to do tricks and "make a pimp rich." P.I.M.P. shows how 50 Cent has been able to appeal to different audiences. His violent personal history, criminal past and gritty urban tales give him street cred. But he also appeals to a mainstream audience because his music sounds good.

  13. The White Stripes-The Hardest Button To Button    (unchanged)      buy it!
    The Hardest Button To Button, the second hit from The White Stripes' Elephant CD, is another hard to resist mix of Jack White's weird personality and his minimal, driving rock music. The Hardest Button shows White's gift for finding a great hook. The Hardest Button is held together by a steady supply of throbbing and pounding sounds. Like Seven Nation Army(which has been in the top 50 for more than eight months), The Hardest Button prominently features a bass sound that, because of Jack White's odd rules, is played by a processed guitar rather than a bass. The Hardest Button gets off to a great start with that Psycho Killer style bass sound joined by the raw guitar sound of White playing notes of chords then by Meg White's bass drum. Jack's voice has its typical slightly demented but committed tone. Meg's simple drumming style is perfect for Hardest Button and the songs that Jack makes in general. Hardest Button climaxes on the chorus with an emphatic guitar sound crashing in unison with the drums. Hardest Button is rock music as Jack White envisions it. It's focused, exciting and lacking in excess. White's strangeness can sometimes be distracting but songs like Hardest Button To Button show how White can create the thrill of a pure rock sound. Hardest Botton is apparently about growing up with a close but troubled family, curing his baby brother's tooth ache with a voodoo doll and feeling "like you're the hardest button to button."

  14. Matchbox 20-Unwell    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Unwell is the second single from the More Than You Think You Are CD. It's an improvement over Disease, a lame attempt at a rocker and pale imitation of Smooth, Rob Thomas' Santana collaboration. Unwell has the soothing, easy, well crafted sound that helped make the band big. The chorus is catchy and hard to resist. But generally, Unwell is bland. It's so tastefully innocuous that it barely registers. A banjo in the beginning and end adds a little flavor but Unwell could use a lot more. It doesn't help that Unwell, like Disease, is another tale of how screwed up Thomas is. Especially now that Matchbox 20 is an established, very successful band, Thomas' repeated tales of woe are increasingly tiresome. Unwell is more optimistic than some of them. Thomas thinks "I'm headed for a breakdown and I don't know why" but he also feels like he'll soon get things together.

  15. Eastmountainsouth-You Dance    (up 3 positions)      buy it!
    Eastmountainsouth is Kat Maslich and Peter Adams, southerners who met in LA and formed a duo making country tinged folk. You Dance is on their self titled debut. You Dance is a thoughtful, very sweet love song. Its sound is a bit on the adult, tasteful side for me but You Dance is very charming. Adams has a basic, sincere voice. You Dance's music is appealingly minimal. It matches the lyric's account of pure, ungimmicky love. Adams' nice, simple, unshowy piano is accompanied by very restrained drums. Maslich's harmonies are very appealing. She reminds me of Syd Straw, a favorite background singer of 80's and 90's alt country bands. You Dance is a touch boring but it's very pleasant. Its avoidance of flash is a refreshing contrast to most contemporary music. You Dance's lyric has lots of likable images. Adams sings about wanting to "carry you away" and "wake you every morning" and asks if he can "wander every day beside you."

  16. Fabolous featuring Tamia-Into You    (up 5 positions)      buy it!
    Into You is from the Street Dreams CD by Brooklyn's Fabolous(born John Jackson). I've never been a fan of Fabolous' reticent mumble, which gives the impression that he thinks he's too cool to go to the effort of being audible. On Into You, he's pretty funny and kind of cute. Hearing him roll through Into You in his rushed, uninflected way brings to mind a boy staring at his shoes as he shyly tells a girl he likes her. Ashanti sang with Fabolous on Into You's album version but the single smartly uses Tamia. Tamia's voice has a sweetness similar to Ashanti's but she seems more substantial and less deferential than Ashanti does when she supports male vocalists. Into You is pretty slight. Its music is pleasant, a little generic and not particularly interesting with a steady, easy, anonymous beat and gentle, kind of cutesy chimes. Still, Into You is very comfortable, with a good supporting vocal, and it does a good job of softening up a tough guy. Fabolous tells his girl in Into You that his "friends be thinking I'm slipping" but he would "do whatever just to keep a grin on you" and he's ready to go public with his feelings.

  17. Sting-Send Your Love    (up 5 positions)      buy it!
    Sting had his biggest hit in years by going the world music route on Brand New Day's Desert Rose, a seductively exotic song featuring Algerian singer Cheb Mami. Not surprisingly, Sting's new Sacred Love has a lot more international musicians and sounds. Send Your Love's music is good. It mixes the jazziness that's marked much of Sting's solo work with more exotic sounds. The result is a loose, unforced, exciting jam. Sting is a gifted, nimble singer. He fits nicely with Send Your Love's quick playing and light rhythmic touch. Send Your Love has a fast, vibrant bass line, an atmospheric, evocative horn and subtle synths that easily float above the other sounds. Send Your Love's downside is that it has a lot of flavor but no center. There's not much of a melody and what there is, in his typical style, echoes previous Sting songs like If You Love Somebody and, of course, Desert Rose. On Sacred Love, Sting makes lots of connections between love and religion and faith. Because it's Sting, the lyrics are thoughtful but quite pretentious. Send Your Love has nice ideas: "you've got a stake in the world we ought to share" and we can make the world a more loving place. But they're surrounded by Sting's musings. The first verse is about how the truth of the universe can be found in a grain of sand or "a single hour". The second one is about how "your mind is a relay station" that can send positive thoughts into the future and to distant galaxies. There are also decent thoughts about finding religion in joy and nature.

  18. Guster-Amsterdam    (down 1 position)      buy it!
    Guster is a Boston band that developed a large following playing lots of gigs with two acoustic guitars and bongos. The guys have since gone electric but they've maintained a simple upbeat sound. Amsterdam, from the Keep It Together CD, is a strong candidate for feel good song of the summer. It's lightweight but very charming. On Amsterdam, Guster remind me of the jangly, perky guitar bands that sprung up in the mid 80s after REM had their initial success. It rides forward easily with a variety of vigorous but smooth strums, a bit of jangling and a crisp, clicking beat. Amsterdam has a pleasant, shiny sound. Ryan Miller's voice isn't amazing but it is warm and good natured. Amsterdam lacks edge and it's kind of saccharine. It does have a likable, clean cut sound with a nice, positive energy. While Amsterdam has a jaunty sound its lyric, written by drummer Brian Rosenworcel, is quite nasty. Amsterdam's giddiness apparently reflects the joy of a spurned lover at the prospect of finding revenge in a nasty letter.

  19. Michelle Branch-Are You Happy Now?    (down 8 positions)      buy it!
    For her new Hotel Paper CD, Michelle Branch stuck with John Shanks, who's worked with Sheryl Crow, Stevie Nicks and Melissa Etheridge and produced Branch's The Spirit Room CD. The result on Are You Happy Now is radio friendly but not very exciting. Alanis Morissette's influence on Branch is quite apparent. The similarity is especially there on Are You Happy Now, which is basically You Oughta Know light. The 21 year old Morissette was fascinating, raging furiously against a betraying boyfriend. The 20 year old Branch merely sounds whiny and self pitying. The other appropriate comparison is to Avril Lavigne. Branch has played the weepy, sensitive second banana to Lavigne's confident, in your face punk rock fan. Are You Happy Now, written by Branch and Shanks, shows awareness of the competition. Branch's screaming on the chorus and the simple, rock guitar driven dramatic music brings Lavigne to mind. Are You Happy Now has some of the thrill that dynamic shifts from quiet to boisterous bring but it doesn't have the energy of Lavigne's best songs. The verses drag by with an uninteresting drum machine beat and vague synth embellishments. Are You Happy Now's lyric perpetuates Branch's persona as the girl who doesn't quite fit in and is doomed to wallow in disappointment. Are You Happy Now is about looking for satisfaction in the fact that the guy who left her isn't happy either. The good news for Branch is that at least as many young women in Branch's target preteen and early teen audience relate to Branch's awkward misfit as to Lavigne's cocky popular girl. Branch's voice is annoyingly girlish and thin but enough girls relate to Branch's insecurities and her very youthful voice to make Are You Happy Now a big hit.

  20. AFI-Leaving Song, Pt. 2    (up 4 positions)      buy it!
    I kind of liked Girl's Not Grey, the earnest but well made and quite exciting first chart hit from AFI's Sing The Sorrow CD. But Leaving Song 2 seems overdramatic and silly to me. At the risk of seeming old, Leaving Song 2 just sounds like a lot of yelling to me. The verses have Davey Havok screaming furiously. The chorus alternates backing singers' ranting with Havok's whining. In between are pretentious metallic guitar sounds, crunching chords and a lot of effort to make Leaving Song 2 sound meaningful. Leaving Song 2's has a dark, over the top, self pitying lyric about a breakup. Havok wails "don't waste your touch, you won't feel anything", "you won't find anything worthy of redeeming." He also sings that you might as well "take my heart away" and about ceasing "all feeling." Havok's pain seems real but it's not very interesting.

  21. Jane's Addiction-Just Because    (down 16 positions)      buy it!
    Perry Farrell has returned to two of his most successful projects. Lollapalooza, the concert tour that Ferrell co-founded, is back for the first time in six years. In time for that Jane's Addiction, with original members Farrell, Dave Navarro and drummer Stephen Perkins, have released Strays, their first record of all new songs since 1990's Ritual de lo Habitual. Jane's Addiction were quite huge but Farrell's intervening work, with Porno For Pyros and on a solo record, was often obscure. Jane's Addiction are smart to reintroduce themselves with a song that gets your attention and announces that they still matter. Farrell and Navarro are also aware that alternative rock music got harder while Jane's Addiction was away. Navarro, who was a Red Hot Chili Pepper and put out a solo record during Jane's break, drives Just Because forward with an attacking, ringing guitar line that sounds a lot like The Edge's on Pride(In The Name Of Love). Farrell tones down his vocal mannerisms. He still has distinctive phrasing, stretching out certain words but his personality doesn't overshadow the song as he does battle with Navarro's slashing. Just Because lacks the eccentricities that originally set the band apart from other groups but it's fun and it rocks. Just Because's lyric is apparently a warning that a relationship might be over because Farrell's partner never does things just because she feels like it.

  22. REM-Bad Day    new to music chart      buy it!
    Bad Day is one of three previously unreleased songs on REM's best of CD: In Time. In Time is a bit of an odd collection. It covers 1988 on, so it misses the music from REM's early, pre-Warner years(which have their own collection, Eponymous), when they made most of their best, most consistent records. In Time misses some seemingly obvious choices like Shiny Happy People(which the band apparently hates). It's a bit lopsided, with four songs from the hit filled Automatic For The People and only one from Out Of Time and Monster. In Time doesn't really recognize the fact that since New Adventures In Hi-Fi, REM's records haven't been that good. So the CD gives you interesting mediocrities like E-Bow The Letter and All The Way To Reno. In Time does gives a home to The Great Beyond, from Jim Carrey's Andy Kaufman movie, and brings new attention to At My Most Beautiful and Daysleeper, brilliant songs from REM's largely ignored Up CD. In Time is also a reminder of how, while always sounding like themselves, REM has never tried too hard to keep up with current trends or repeat what's brought them success. So it's odd that REM have so obviously recycled one of their bigger hits for Bad Day. From its verses stuffed with Michael Stipe's rush of nonsequitors and gibberish to its simple, singalong chorus, Bad Day basically is a rehash of It's The End Of The World. While Bad Day, which was written in the 80s, is a knockoff, it does have a lot of the qualities that have always made REM's music appealing. It's comforting to hear Peter Buck's nonstop flow of varied, likable jangly guitar riffs, Stipes's stong, warm vocal and Mike Mills sweet, unpolished backing vocals. The difference in Bad Day from End Of The World is its vibe. Stipe sang with youthful confidence about feeling fine, even as the world became more confusing and screwed up. On Bad Day, Stipe sings "count your bleesings", "we all fall down" and "please don't take a picture." I also like Bad Day's video. Besides smartly capturing the information saturated screen and obsession with freakish weather events of contemporary news shows, it also presents Stipe, Buck and Mills as unassuming tv presences I'd love to see on morning tv.

  23. Kelly Clarkson-Low    new to music chart      buy it!
    While her record sales have been eclipsed by those of American Idol 2 runnerup Clay Aiken, Kelly Clarkson has made the transition from American Idol winner to mainstream pop radio star. A Moment Like This, Clarkson's first hit, was the kind of overblown ballad that gave American Idol a bad name but the singles from Clarkson's Thankful CD have been glossy and generic but tolerable studio constructions. Low was written by Jimmy Harry, whose main previous credits included work on records by Kylie Minogue and RuPaul, and produced by Clif Magness, who worked on most of the non-smash hits on Avril Lavigne's Let Go CD(both Harry and Magness also worked on Aiken's CD). Low is largely inoffensive but annoyingly overproduced. Magness throws in far too many sounds, with lots of different synth effects. The chorus is particular silly, reaching for crescendos with bombastic guitars, booming drums and layers of backing singers. Amidst the overstuffed arrangement, Clarkson doesn't get the chance to show much personality but she does reveal a decent voice. She does the obligatory, showy reaching for high notes but doesn't go as far over the top as the music leads her. Clarkson's singing is largely strong and appealing. Low is about dealing with things after being dumped by a guy who made a mess of things.

  24. Limp Bizkit-Eat You Alive    (down 8 positions)      buy it!
    First, guitarist Wes Borland left Limp Bizkit. Then the band recorded and scrapped albums worth of material with new guitar player Mike Smith. Finally, Limp Bizkit is back with the Results May Vary CD. Eat You Alive, the CD's first single, doesn't do anything to resuscitate the career of the once hugely successful but now widely reviled Fred Durst. Almost everything about Eat You Alive is terrible. Durst's one talent was an ability, with Borland's help, to give his mediocre hard rock a decent groove. Eat You Alive totally lacks any kind of groove, forcing us to focus on Durst's weak, whiny singing and nasty lyrics and his band's lame attempts to make arty hard rock in the Tool/Korn vein. Eat You Alive is dominated by Durst's unappealing tough guy ranting and creepy personality. Guitars and drums pound away bombastically in the background but never really get anywhere. Eat You Alive depicts Durst as a leerer/stalker. Durst curses out a woman then tells her "I'm drawn to you." He notes that she's too cool to want anything to do with him, alternates hoots of "you're so hot" with apologies for his behavior and pathetically(and somewhat scarily) repeats "I just want to look at you all day; there ain't nothing wrong with that."

  25. Chevelle-Send The Pain Below    (down 16 positions)      buy it!
    Send The Pain Below is the second chart hit from the Wonder What's Next CD by the band comprised of three born again Christian brothers from Chicago. The Red was a bit monotonous but it had a good, insinuating guitar riff and had a long run on rock radio. Send The Pain Below is less distinctive. It has the Creed feeling of being a pastiche of Pearl Jam and other grunge bands. At least singer Pete Loeffler doesn't come across pretentiously like Creed's Scott Stapp. He's thoughtful in an unshowy way as he sings about his ability to suppress his emotional pain. His low key guitar playing is appropriate to the lyrics' stark emotion. At times, the match of restrained but intense singing and basic, booming sustained chords remind me of Radiohead's Creep. But generally, Send The Pain Below doesn't have Creep's depth. It's so downbeat that it's hard to distinguish from the other songs where young men share their hurt. The similarity to other songs is accentuated towards the end when Loeffler goes into a Korn/Trust Company style rant("I can't feel my chest,drop down"). Send The Pain Below's message is oddly common in similar songs: you hurt me when you manipulated when we were together and I miss you. Send The Pain Below has an intensity that can be compelling but it's ultimately too indistinctive and humorless to keep my interest.

Songs 1-25


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