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All-Reviews.com Top 50 Songs*:
for the 4th week of February, 2002

*based on airplay at alternative, pop and rock radio stations a cross the nation (reviews by LarryG)

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(songs 1-25)

  1. Dave Matthews Band-Everyday    (unchanged)      buy it!
    The Dave Matthews Band's Everyday CD isn't great but it does have quite a few decent ballads. The best ones keep things simple and relaxed. Everyday's title track is probably the best song on the record. Vocals by South African singer Vusi Mahlasela help create a joyful feel. Everyday shows off the band's strong musicianship. Backing vocals, guitar, horns and Carter Beauford's drums all contribute to Everday's light and playful but rich sound. Everyday's "all you need is love" refrain is nothing new but it fits a song about reducing things to the basics that advises us to "get your hands dirty" and seek love.

  2. The Strokes-Last Nite    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Quite a bit of hype, largely created by the British music press, surrounded the Strokes before they even had a record out. The hype is mostly justified by Is This It, one of the best CDs of 2001. Fans of late 70s/early 80s new wave are especially likely to enjoy Is This It's deft constructions. Julian Casablancas is appealingly confident as he channels cool alternative crooners like Lou Reed, Ian McCulloch and The Fall's Mark E. Smith while Nick Valersi lays down tight, jagged guitar lines reminiscent of Gang Of Four and, especially, Television's Richard Lloyd. Last Nite is kind of like Iggy Pop singing over Tom Petty's American Girl. With its steady, jaunty strumming and sturdy bass line, Last Nite is a good example of the Strokes' fun, basic sound. Last Nite is about having enough and walking away from a girlfriend who feels "so down" because no one understands her.

  3. Shakira-Whenever Wherever    (down 9 positions)      buy it!
    Colombian soap opera and pop music star Shakira learned English before she wrote and sung the Laundry Service CD. She's charming, pinching or stretching out words and giving them novel pronounciations. The lyrics, about being willing to travel the globe to keep a relationship going with a distant lover, including "lucky my breasts are small and humble so you don't confuse them with mountains", often have a goofy charm. Otherwise, Whenever Wherever has the charms and annoyances of much mainstream Latin pop. Whenever Wherever has a broad, fakey sound and a repetitive beat. It also has the genre's big, loose charm. Shakira's voice is theatrical and slightly hysterical. A pan flute sound supplies an exotic touch.

  4. Foo Fighters-The One    (down 8 positions)      buy it!
    The buzz that accompanied Dave Grohl's first post-Nirvana release is long gone. Grohl's band have become modern rock journeymen of sorts, making three strong, if unremarkable, records and numerous good singles that show Grohl's ability to make music that's appealingly poppy but still rocks. The One, the second hit from the Orange County soundtrack, is short and a little dopey. It's even more disposable than most Foo singles but it's tight, catchy and hard to resist. The One is simple but effectively concise with thumping verses and a chorus with guitars and Grohl's voice howling. On The One, Grohl realizes the mistake of going back to an old flame but still appreciates the pleasures she offers.

  5. Ja Rule-Always On Time    (up 2 positions)      buy it!
    Jeff Atkins is ubiquitous these days. While Livin' It Up was still on the chart, Always On Time, the third chart hit from his Pain Is Love, crossed over from the R&B charts to the pop charts. Like Livin' It Up, Always On Time is lightweight and enjoyable. Ja Rule's rough vocal is again matched with a much more melodic voice. The music is easy and enjoyable with a relaxed beat, a good guitar riff and sweet vocals from Ashanti and background singers. Always On Time is pretty stupid, bragging about Ja Rule's talent as a lover("I got two hoes" "and I keep 'em drugged up off that ecstasy") while he apologizes for behavior that led to restraining orders and asks for another chance. Ja Rule's rapping skills are little more than competent but he and producer Irv Gotti have hit upon a successful formula. His voice adds edge but doesn't overpower his smooth, tuneful music.

  6. Chris Isaak-Let Me Down Easy    (up 2 positions)      buy it!
    While Chris Isaak seems like a mellow guy, he obviously has savvy businessmen behind him. In January, Isaak achieved big time synergy as, nearly simultaneously with the release of Isaak's new Always Got Tonight CD, Showtime began the second season of Isaak's genial, slight rock sitcom and VH1 played a marathon of the show's first season. In 1985, Isaak came on the scene with his spare, haunted, Roy Orbison influenced Silvertone record. Since then, Isaak has mostly omitted the raw, stark feel but, especially since Wicked Game gave him his one big hit, otherwise continued to make the same kind of moody, adult, country flavored records. Isaak's songs often involve Isaak getting his heart broken and/or being haunted by the memory of the ideal woman who left. While Isaak's music is predictable and a little too smooth, it's still good. His songs are well played and have good atmosphere. Isaak's vocals are cool and self confident with a self deprecating charm that also suits him well(despite minimal acting skills) on his sitcom. Let Me Down Easy is similar to Somebody's Crying and other mellow midtempo Isaak songs but it's likable. Let Me Down Easy has a mechanical beat but it has a good ringing guitar riff. On Let Me Down Easy, Isaak again broods about falling hard for a woman who doesn't reciprocate his feelings.

  7. Alicia Keys-A Women's Worth    (down 3 positions)      buy it!
    Inevitably, the novelty of Fallin's clean, retro sound faded after dozens of listens. And I've seen enough of Alicia Keys' blissfully confident face. Still, Keys' singles are oases of thoughtful, real sounding music in the fake, overproduced world of top 40 radio. A Women's Worth, like Fallin', has a smart sound that, with touches of atmospheric keyboards, percussion and psychedelic guitar, obviously alludes to classic mellow late 60s and early 70s soul but also shows Keys' smart, cool personality. Keys has a good voice but she again cleverly fills out a minimal sound with good backing vocals. Keys' lyrics advise men that the best way to win her and women in general is to treat them with respect. They naturally fit the song's easy but self assured sound.

  8. N Sync-Girlfriend    (up 5 positions)      buy it!
    Girlfriend, the third single from N Sync's Celebrity record is my favorite from the record so far. On Girlfriend, the boys worked with very busy producers The Neptunes. Partly because N Sync are better singers, Girlfriend is more enjoyable than Britney Spears' I'm A Slave For You, which was a mess despite a striking, good Neptunes production. With a good borrowed riff and a light, steady beat, Girlfriend has a relaxed, breezy feel. N Sync's harmonies are impressive and fit nicely with the easy mood. N Sync's chief hunk Justin Timberlake, who wrote Girlfriend with The Neptunes, plays a guy trying to convince a girl that while the boy she's likes "doesn't even know you're there", he'll "treat you good." The lyrics are typical boy band fodder but neither they nor some silly whispered interjections negate Girlfriend's charm.

  9. Leann Rimes-Can't Fight The Moonlight    (unchanged)      buy it!
    At 19, Leann Rimes apparently is no longer satisfied being America's innocent sweetheart. With a mature look on the cover of her I Need You CD and Can't Fight The Moonlight's synthetic dance pop production, Rimes is clearly pushing for a piece of Britney and Christina's audience. She's probably succeeded with a fairly state of the art sound but Can't Fight The Moonlight is so uninteresting and unoriginal that it makes a song like Genie In A Bottle seem remarkably loose and fresh in comparison. Can't Fight The Moonlight's drum machines sound particularly recycled. The song uses the same kind of latin guitar that's shown up on songs by at least half of the dance pop artists of the last few years. In the past, Rimes has shown signs of a decent voice but here her voice is processed to fit the beat to the point where she could be J. Lo or a lesser Aguilera. Rimes played it safe for I Need You's first single, using a song written by Diane Warren, who wrote Rimes' biggest hit How Do I Live and assembly line hits like Starship's Nothing Gonna Stop Us Now and Aerosmith's I Don't Want To Miss A Thing and tends to sprinkle her songs with cliches. Can't Fight The Moonlight, with lines promising "there's no escaping love" and "we'll be lost in the rhythm so right, it will steal your heart tonight", couldn't have taken more than a few minutes for Warren to throw together.

  10. Mary J. Blige-No More Drama    (up 7 positions)      buy it!
    Mary J. Blige follows the very fun, relaxed Family Affair with a much more serious statement of purpose.Your opinion of the second hit and title track from Blige's No More Drama CD has to be depend on how interesting a character you find Blige. Blige mocks her often overly dramatic, confrontational image by using the theme from The Young and The Restless soap opera as a base but it doesn't change the fact that No More Drama is heavy stuff that uses a melodramatic sound to declare an end to a dramatic life. Blige's vocal, as usual, is strong and compelling but, especially at the end when the otherwise minimal sound swells and she and backing singers try to outdo each other, her singing verges on emoting. Blige rues the lesson learned from having her heart broken and, using the power of positive thinking, pledges to never cry again, vowing: "I choose to win."

  11. Starsailor-Good Souls    (up 4 positions)      buy it!
    You'd figure that the last thing the world needs is another British band doing restrained, atmospheric versions of middle period Radiohead songs. On Good Souls, from the Love Is Here CD, Starsailor seem even more sensitive than the recent bands(Coldplay, Travis and especially Doves) they resemble, if that's possible. James Walsh's painfully earnest, quavery vocal and his timid lyric, telling us he feels "sick after every meal" and crying out "I need to be loved" are a tad too precious. I still like Good Souls. Walsh's open, idealistic voice is compelling and well matched by Good Soul's dense but soaring keyboard propelled sound.

  12. Creed-Bullets    new to music chart      buy it!
    Creed start their latest CD with Bullets, an angry, paranoid diatribe. Their Human Clay CD had What If, a similar angry hard rocker with violent imagery. But Bullets combines Scott Stapp's self righteous discomfort with most of mankind and desire for some sort of spiritual departure with an even more heightened anger. The result is a song that's musically quite compelling and lyrically quite disturbing. Bullets, the second chart hit from the Weathered CD, starts with what sounds like a messianic voice claiming he hears "the earth seeking relief." Then Stapp, sounding sincerely pissed, apparently fueled by hostility towards music critics, sings of the "forces all around me" "who hide behind the shadows" and of being "disgraced by jealousy and lies." Bullets' central image is being shot in the head by someone who won't even look him in the face. Stapp tell his critics that he's just looking for "what's real", that he gets the last laugh because he's gotten inside their mind and that he and his enemies will all be happy when he finds a higher place and they can stay away from each other. Stapp's singing is still mannered but it's less complacent than on Creed's hits, reaching the kind of intensity that his role models from Alice In Chains and Stone Temple Pilots had at their angriest. Bullets' music, with tight, powerful juiced up guitars, is certainly better than Creed's bloated, soaring trademark sound. But the nastiest of Bullets' message ruins the song for me.

  13. Mary J. Blige-Family Affair    (down 7 positions)      buy it!
    Family Affair, from Blige's No More Drama CD, is Blige's biggest pop hit so far and it deserves its success. It has one of the best grooves of the year. Dr Dre's production is quite brilliant. The music, with an easy, shuffling beat and good backing vocals and keyboards, is relaxed but substantial. Blige has established a "don't mess with me" image but on Family Affair she sounds like she's having a good time, advising us to "leave your situations at the door" and "get it crunk", which apparently has something to do with dancing and having fun. Blige's vocal skills are on display as she smoothly scats around the beat.

  14. System Of A Down-Chop Suey    (down 2 positions)      buy it!
    Finally, after so many serious, self pitying, soundalike bands have dominated rock radio, a hard rock band has a hit that sounds different and shows a sense of humor. With tough guitars and hardcore fast drums, Chop Suey, from the Toxicity CD, has the chops necessary to keep the headbangers happy but it's also refreshingly weird. Serj Tankian's over the top vocal takes Chop Suey all over the map, starting as a punk rant, slowing down for a meaningful croon that may be mocking his self important contemporaries("I don't think you trust in my self righteous suicide") and eventually shifting to a spacy, gothic conclusion.

  15. Britney Spears-I'm Not A Girl, Not Yet A Woman    (down 1 position)      buy it!
    Like I'm A Slave For U, I'm Not A Girl, Not Yet A Woman, the second single from the Britney CD, is going to have a deservedly short stay on the top 50. I'm Not A Girl, also featured on the soundtrack of the apparently awful Britney film vehicle Crossroads, is mostly of interest as another part of the strategy of marketing Britney. Britney's innocent/jailbait act has grown wearisome. But remarkably, after years of success and of continually and increasingly presenting a mature, sexual image, her young girl fans still see her as a role model and one of them. By almost any definition(except most states' drinking age and, if you believe Britney, virginity) Britney's clearly a woman. The only line in I'm Not A Girl that seems to ring true is: "this girl will always find her way." Still, a lot of girls swept up in the confusion of puberty must relate to I'm Not A Girl or project their experience onto its very simple lyrics. Musically, I'm Not A Girl's easy listening sound, with tasteful piano and a light beat, is kind of a bore. As usual, I enjoy a Britney ballad even less than a Britney dance song because her thin, undynamic vocal is less disguised.

  16. City High-Caramel    (unchanged)      buy it!
    With its provocative justification of prostitution as a way to support a family and its smart, sleek sound, What Would You Do was a striking debut from City High's self titled CD. Their second chart hit Caramel is O.K. but less interesting lyrically and musically. While similar to other recent music, Caramel's music isn't bad. It's smooth, mellow hip hop with Claudette Ortiz' appealing vocal, a good, uncluttered sound and a crisp, restrained beat. The lyrics are pretty dopey. It starts with Ortiz' self satisfied description of herself. We learn that she likes "going out, taking walks and stuff", has everything she wants and(exactly like Mya on her 2000 hit Free) is happy being "5'5" with brown eyes." Then comes an even stupider section where one of City High's male singers invites a girl to "spend the night popping" champagne in the hot tub. On the remixed single, guest rapper Eve lifts the song from its complacency with a good, feisty rap, telling us she's not about "gift chasin'" and not impressed with champagne poppin'.

  17. Trik Turner-Friends And Family     (up 8 positions)      buy it!
    Friends and Family, from the Phoenix band's self titled CD, is similar to Everlast's hits in using a spare sound for a very serious, heartfelt account. You can't argue with the song's premise that what really matters is the love of your friends and family though that message is surrounded by less appealing lines about keeping a(presumably musical) dream alive by overcoming the odds and those who criticize. Friends And Family has a striking, atmospheric sound, with a simple beat and minimal keyboards. But, especially after repeat listens, I find the song too solemn and, while it sounds like it's about something important, it's not actually that interesting.

  18. U2-In A Little While    (unchanged)      buy it!
    The songs on U2's All That You Can't Leave Behind took on greater meaning after September 11th. Their empathetic, hopeful feeling seemed perfect for the times. U2 picked a great to move away from the ironic, superficial songs that characterized much of their 90s work and combine the hopefulness of their earlier work with a modesty appropriate for guys who've been around long enough to know that goals aren't always easily met. The singles from All You Can't Leave Behind have been big anthems but the CD also has good quiet songs like the simply idealistic Peace On Earth and the playful Wild Honey. In A Little While, the CD's fifth song to make the top 50, is a rich love song with a timeless quality. Brian End added subtle strings to The Edge's good, basic guitar riff. Bono remarkably kept his enormous ego in check nearly throughout All That You Can't Leave Behind. He's very sweet on In A Little While, promising a longtime friend "surely you'll be mine."

  19. Tantric-Mourning    (down 8 positions)      buy it!
    Mourning is the third chart hit from the debut CD by the musicians who have recaptured success after getting kicked out of Days Of The New while Travis Meeks' second version of Days Of The New has sunk without a trace. It's a shame that Tantric's tale of resurrection isn't accompanied by better music. Tantric seem like decent musicians but they're making very standard angry rock. Hugo Ferreira, the singer the ex-Days picked, is just another intense, deep sub-Vedder voice. The lyric starts by claiming he's learned about himself and can deal with another woman hurting him but soon accuses her for "all the lies" and how she "conned me into thinking that all I had was you."

  20. System Of A Down-Toxicity    new to music chart      buy it!
    It's probably not the main effect they're shooting for but I like System Of A Down because they're fun. Their powerful music and Serj Tankian's singing can shift in a moment from thoughtful to manic, creating an unpredictability that's nearly absent in contemporary rock. Toxicity's verses, with forboding guitar and Serj's brooding vocal, explode into choruses of Serj's rant and big guitars and drums. As Toxicity, the title track and second hit from the band's latest CD, reaches its conclusion, it becomes even more chaotic, finishing with fast hardcore style thrashing guitar and drums and Serj's bizarre chant: "when I became the sun, I shone life into the man's heart." I like System Of A Down's passion and the fact that their songs are about more than their petty personal problems. I'm not exactly sure what Toxicity is about but I guess it has something to do with capitalism and the fact that even if big business thinks it owns and can ruin the world it can't control the world's natural disorder.

  21. Adema-The Way You Like It    (up 2 positions)      buy it!
    The Way You Like It is the second single from Adema's self titled CD. Adema is perhaps the best example of what's wrong with today's mainstream rock. They inspired a bidding was among record labels, presumably partly because Adema's singer Mark Chavez is the half brother of Korn front man Jonathan Davis and partly because they sound so much like other bands that have had big record sales. There is a similarity between Korn and Adema in the way they try to mix hard rock guitar and synths to create a meaningful atmosphere. The difference between them is that Korn sometimes actually achieves real meaning while Adema's music is garbage that resembles more meaningful work. With a high pitched, spooky riff, The Way You Like It tells us from the start that it's grasping for significance. But even more than Adema's first single Giving In, which at least had an interesting topic(an alcoholic's inabiliy to avoid self destruction), The Way You Like It has a dark surface but no substance. On The Way You Like It, Chavez is apparently already complaining about how fame attracts fake friends and nasty gossip. Adema partly resemble Linkin Park, whose angry hard rock Hybrid Theory CD was the biggest selling CD of 2001(how 'bout that for a depressing sign of the times). But Adema doesn't have Linkin Park's hip hip fluidity. The only thing vaguely hip hop about The Way You Like It is its complaint about player hating. The Way You Like It's crunching guitar and Chavez' staccato, often yelled, vocal are hostile enough to make it on rock radio but it's not good or interesting.

  22. Pete Yorn-Strange Condition    (unchanged)      buy it!
    The New Jersey native/LA resident singer and songwriter's following continues to slowly grow. His debut CD is still getting radio play nearly a year after its release. In my mind, Bob Dylan's Love and Theft is the only 2001 rock CD that's better than Yorn's Musicforthemorningafter and The Strokes' Is This It is the only other one that might be as good. The CD has consistently strong songs: great, fun rockers and cool, brooding ballads. Brad Wood, who produced and played on records for Liz Phair, played a similar role for Yorn, another striking, confident young talent. Music . . . was apparently a low budget production but the songs are carefully constructed with layers of instruments, giving even the quietest songs a likable, textured feeling. Strange Condition follows Life On A Chain as Yorn's second chart hit(For Nancy fell just short of the top 50). R Walt Vincent's harmonica, layered over Yorn's acoustic guitar, contributes to a good, moody feel. Yorn is cool, as always, playing a tortured soul on Strange Condition.

  23. John Mayer-No Such Thing    (down 3 positions)      buy it!
    With its very mild sense of rebellion and Mayer's pleasant, modest vocals No Such Thing, from the Room For Squares CD, is perfectly designed for adult contemporary radio. No Such Thing reminds me of previous well made, easy rock hits by aging young white guys like Marc Cohn, Sister Hazel and Mayer's current competitor, Five For Fighting. No Such Thing's whimsical lyrics gently protest a world that tells you "stay inside the lines" and proclaim that "the real world" is "just a lie you've got to rise above." The first hit from the Atlanta based singer/songwriter is smoothly genial but very familiar and mild.

  24. Toya-I Do    (down 3 positions)      buy it!
    I Do, from the St. Louis singer's debut Toya CD, is fairly standard dance pop with a familiar story of a woman trying to entice "a six foot stallion with the story of a thug" that she sees on the dance floor. I Do isn't ground breaking but it does have a pretty interesting, steady sound with chiming effects and a minimal, percussive beat.

  25. Lenny Kravitz-Stillness Of Heart    new to music chart      buy it!
    Dig In, the first single from the Lenny CD, showed a side of Lenny Kravitz that he hadn't shown much before. Dig In was a light, fun rocker that lacked the heavy attitude than often drags down Kravitz' music. Stillness Of Heart doesn't have Dig In's lightness and excitement but it's still a good, if not great, second single. Stillness Of Heart's melody is very similar to that of his second to last hit: Again. Stillness Of Heart achieves a good edge by holding back and going nice and slow. Heavy bass and drums create a good, slow jam on the verses and are joined on the chorus by a solid, steady guitar strum. Unlike Dig In, Stillness Of Heart doesn't really sound like a hit. Nothing really happens. It's got a good atmosphere but doesn't grab you. Kravitz' typically complacent vocal doesn't help. On Stillness Of Heart, Kravitz sings about trying to calm and center himself so that he can move on after a tough romantic experience. I'm not questioning Kravitz' pain but his way of expressing it is hardly great poetry. This is the second verse: "I got more than I can eat, a life that can't be beat/yet still I feel this heat, I'm feeling incomplete/What am I buying, my soul is crying."

Songs 1-25


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