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Archive of Top-50 Song Reviews
for songs where the Artist's name begins with "E"

This archive contains the song reviews that appear in our weekly Top-50 Song Charts (which we started in 1999). Reviews are written by LarryG exclusively for All-Reviews.com. You can also browse the song archives by song title.

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Eamon - F**k It(I Don't Want You Back)    Weeks on Chart: 13  Peak: # 22 (March 2004)   buy it!
Eamon is a 19 year old singer from Staten Island. F**k It, from his I Don't Want You Back CD, started with airplay on a few stations and slowly became a big hit. I loved F**k It when I first heard it and it was called Nothing Compares 2 U. To me, F**k It sounds a lot like Sinead O'Connor's 1990 Prince penned hit. The comparison is kind of a compliment. With its simple, stark synth & basic beats backing, F**k It evokes the same obsessive sense Nothing Compares 2 U did. F**k It makes it clear, like a good breakup song should, that Eamon would love to have her back. Eamon's singing has a wounded feel that makes his pain sound real. Eamon will likely be a one hit wonder. He's apparently not a great singer; his voice benefits from a bit of electronic tweaking. He doesn't seem so smart; the interviews I've seen present him as an extremely regular guy. But with F**k It, Eamon has made a lasting contribution to the ranks of songs about heartbroken guys. F**k It's lyric is a very typical lament about having loved and trusted a woman who cheated on him. F**k It also has the typical "happy" ending of being able to turn her down when she comes back for another chance. I know he's upset but he still shouldn't call her a "hoe".

Earshot - Get Away    Weeks on Chart: 9  Peak: # 21 (July 2002)   buy it!
Get Away is from the LA based band's Letting Go CD. Get Away has the intense, dramatic feel of Tool or A Perfect Circle. Singer/songwriter Will Martin does an agonized howl like Maynard James Keenan's. On the verses, Martin's vocal moves forward in jerks over an ominous, rumbling bass. Then on the chorus, Martin's wail gets tougher as the guitars begin to pound. Get Away's sound isn't very likable but it is big and powerful. On Get Away, Martin apparently complains about having to live through all kinds of tension and pressure because of all the sick and disturbing things that have come out since his partner started looking inside.

Eastmountainsouth - You Dance    Weeks on Chart: 8  Peak: # 39 (Oct. 2003)   buy it!
Eastmountainsouth is Kat Maslich and Peter Adams, southerners who met in LA and formed a duo making country tinged folk. You Dance is on their self titled debut. You Dance is a thoughtful, very sweet love song. Its sound is a bit on the adult, tasteful side for me but You Dance is very charming. Adams has a basic, sincere voice. You Dance's music is appealingly minimal. It matches the lyric's account of pure, ungimmicky love. Adams' nice, simple, unshowy piano is accompanied by very restrained drums. Maslich's harmonies are very appealing. She reminds me of Syd Straw, a favorite background singer of 80's and 90's alt country bands. You Dance is a touch boring but it's very pleasant. Its avoidance of flash is a refreshing contrast to most contemporary music. You Dance's lyric has lots of likable images. Adams sings about wanting to "carry you away" and "wake you every morning" and asks if he can "wander every day beside you."

Eddie Vedder - You've Got To Hide Your Love Away    Weeks on Chart: 10  Peak: # 18 (March 2002)   buy it!
The I Am Sam soundtrack is all covers of Beatles songs. Most of the music, like Rufus Wainwright and Aimee Mann & Michael Penn's contributions, is nice and well made but extremely predictable. I wish more of the artists were a little less respectful and took some more chances. Eddie Vedder's You've Got To Hide Your Love is quite good but also basically what you would expect. As usual, Eddie is serious and deep voiced though not as serious and deep voiced as he can be. It's just him, his acoustic and a little of his harmonica on a pleasant throwaway version of John Lennon's brilliantly simple evocation of the pain of getting dumped(and feeling like the world is laughing you) after you've trusted love and made yourself vulnerable.

Eiffel 65 - Blue(Da Ba Dee)    Weeks on Chart: 11  Peak: # 25 (Jan. 2000)   buy it!
As Mambo No. 5 has finally fallen down the charts, Blue is the latest big novelty hit. In its low budget sound and quirkiness, Blue brings to mind some of the fun, silly disco of the late 70's. Blue begins with the surreal tale of living in a world where everything, and he means everything, is blue. Then it just drifts along with lots of da da dee's, not totally unlike Crystal Waters' homeless song. You might enjoy it for a while until hearing it repeatedly drives you crazy.

Eminem - Cleanin' Out My Closet    Weeks on Chart: 9  Peak: # 25 (Sept. 2002)   buy it!
Eminem knows that he has created enough interest that millions want to know about his history and grudges. Cleanin' Out My Closet, The Eminem Show CD's second single, is another account of the reasons he hates various people in his life. Eminem starts Cleanin' Out My Closet whining about being "protested and discriminated against." He congratulates himself for not leaving his daughter like his "faggot father" left him and for "taking them bullets out of that gun" instead of killing his ex-wife. But Eminem mostly focuses his anger on his mom. We learn that Debbie popped prescription pills, made little Marshall a "victim of Munchausen syndrome(making him "believe I was sick when I wasn't") and that when her brother died, said she wished it was her son who died. Eminem is pretty unappealing, asking for sympathy but showing none for a woman who, even according to his account, went through some very tough times. But like him or not, it's hard to argue against the idea that he provides great theatre, at least giving the impression that he's allowing us a glimpse into a unique, troubled mind. On The Eminem Show, Eminem, assisted by Jeff Bass, has generally replaced his mentor Dr. Dre as his music's producer. The quality of Eminem's tracks vary but he did a good job on the singles. Cleanin' Out My Closet doesn't have Without Me's energy. Eminem cleared out the sound on Cleanin' Out My Closet, keeping the focus on his lyrics. The tapping percussion and Bass' playing create a stark, haunted feel consistent with recounting stories of a dark past. Eminem's technique isn't as impressive as his breathless, nonstop rap on Without Me but he has no trouble keeping his audience's attention with a style that's simultaneously casual, confident and troubled.

Eminem - Lose Yourself    Weeks on Chart: 19  Peak: # 3 (Dec. 2002)   buy it!
It makes sense that Eminem is making his film acting debut in the semi-autobiographical 8 Mile. He's always had a lot of presence and self confidence and has specialized in self aggrandizing semi-autobiographical work. Lose Yourself, from the 8 Mile soundtrack, continues Eminem's huge breakthrough year on the pop charts. He's had his first three top ten hits in 2002. Lose Yourself isn't as distinctive as most of Eminem's previous singles but it is another good, interesting song. Lose Yourself has a tense, urgent sound. Eminem's rap is, as usual, technically strong. He evokes the tension of the performer trying to take advantage of his "one shot" with a breathless, agitated delivery. Jeff Bass' threatening, repeated guitar line and a stiff, basic beat emphasizes Lose Yourself's edgy feel. Eminem opens with vivid description of a sweaty performer. Since it's Eminem, it's not surprising that the details include that he's vomited his mom's spaghetti on his sweater. Eminem's depicts the combination of insecurity and confidence in his ability that drives him. His character is nervous but "looks calm and ready." Choking on stage just gets him mad and more determined. Audience rejection whips up a rage that sharpens his work. Shifting into the first person on the final verse, Eminem's intensity builds. He lists the forces threatening to overwhelm him: determination not to return to his mom's trailer life, the "dishonor" of struggling "to feed and water my seed", his "prima donna baby mama" and the boredom of a "normal life." He resolves to "formulate a plot 'fore I end up in jail or shot." As usual, Eminem is overly melodramatic but he ends up producing something exciting.

Eminem - The Real Slim Shady    Weeks on Chart: 12  Peak: # 13 (July 2000)   buy it!
On the first single from the Marshall Mathers Lp, Eminem is, as usual, obnoxious, self pitying but also pretty funny. Real Slim Shady is getting played on alternative radio while Forgot About Dre, also produced by Dr. Dre with a similar light but sinister nursery rhyme type backing track, isn't. Is it because of Eminem's color? Regardless, Real Slim Shady is fun. Despite his dopey demeanor and accent, Eminem is a pretty fluid rapper and Real Slim Shady is fast with good momentum. Eminem is conflicted, excited about the prospect of lots of Eminem wannabes "who could be workin' at Burger King, spittin' on your onion rings" yet so insecure about the possibility of a white rap usurper that he needs to repeatedly tell us that he's the real thing. He rightly says he doesn't care about those who say that Will Smith has hits without swearing but whines about an unfair world where Tom Green can be dirty and he can't. He disses and distances himself from Britney and Christina, refusing to admit that he, like them, owes much of their career to image and MTV. Eminem's a fascinating character, bursting with ideas, some foolish, some insightful.

Eminem - Sing For The Moment    Weeks on Chart: 12  Peak: # 21 (May 2003)   buy it!
When The Eminem Show came out, its rock songs, Sing For The Moment and White America seemed like an attempt to hedge bets by an artist who had sold millions of records but had yet to have a big pop or rock radio hit. Eminem's hits have since crossed over to nearly every format so the rock inflected songs have proven commercially unnecessary. But Sing For The Moment has provided another good single from a good album. Dream On is a fairly obvious song to sample for a hip hop track. It's familiar and dramatic. Especially with Aerosmith guitarist Joe Perry doing a new, showy solo, Sing for The Moment is over the top and overloaded with meaningful sounds. But melodrama is a natural mode for Eminem. On the verses, over a big, basic beat and muted guitar, Eminem again gets to show off his rap's slithery facility as he powerfully drives the song forward. The intensity of Sing For The Moment's music matches Eminem's typical sense of self dramatization. He declares that his "ideas are nightmares for white parents" and that the parents' "worst fear" is kids emulating him since that would show that what the parents say "has no bearing." Eminem gets a chance to vent his paranoia, saying that while kids "worship us", "critics crucify you", attorneys all want "to get they hands on every dime you have" and "prosecuters wanna convict me." Eminem's defense is "if my music is literal and I'm a criminal", how can I raise a little girl? Eminem assumes that criminals will blame his music for the crimes they commit, concedes that violent imagery helps his sales and credits himself for giving hope to kids "who don't have a thing except for a dream." With its heavy feel, Sing For The Moment isn't as fun as some of Eminem's hits but it maintains a good sense of urgency and again shows that Eminem is a gifted rapper and fascinating personality.

Eminem - Stan    Weeks on Chart: 4  Peak: # 41 (Dec. 2000)   buy it!
Stan, the latest single from Eminem's Marshall Mathers LP, is one of most interesting singles to hit mainstream radio this year. Dido's easy vocals and the unhurried groove, with Mike Elizondo's smooth bass line, provide a great contrast with Eminem's fast, fluid rap that becomes increasingly agitated along with his character's troubled mind. As usual, the lyrics alternate between fascinating and irritating. Eminem concedes he has an effect on his fans. He raises legitimate issues about a society where people are encouraged to believe celebrities are just like them. Stan is a frightening, obsessive character, "a biggest fan" who bases his life on Eminem, menacingly suggests "we should be together" and is infuriated when his idol doesn't respond to his letters. Stan is undoubtedly based on real people who want to connect with Eminem, sometimes in scary ways. I'd prefer Stan without its self serving final verse. Eminem suddenly becomes caring, writing Stan that he shouldn't take his self destructive lyrics seriously and should get counseling and treat his girl better. The end is silly. Eminem warns Stan not to end up like a guy he saw on TV who killed himself and his pregnant girlfriend and then realizes,"his name was . . . it was you. Damn."

Eminem - Superman    Weeks on Chart: 8  Peak: # 28 (March 2003)   buy it!
Superman is the third hit from The Eminem Show CD. In 2002 Eminem had his two biggest pop hits so far, Without Me and Lose Yourself, songs where the raps were so fluid and the music had so much momentum that it almost seemed irrelevant whether Mr. Mathers is a screwed up, misogynist jerk. Superman isn't as appealing. It gives a listener a chance to remember what's annoying about Eminem. On Superman, Eminem offers glimpses of his fast, smooth rapping skills but it's largely bad jokes and a fairly uninteresting, unvaried backing track. Superman is mostly stupid and pointless. It's basically about how "I'll never let another girl bring me down" and how he's basically resigned to a life of one night stands with "tricks" he'll more likely than not dis once they're done. In a mock sensitive voice, Eminem goofs on the idea of a caring guy "here to save you girl" and grow together with her. In case you don't get the joke, he follows that with "bitch, you make me hurl." He also says "don't put out, I'll put you." Dina Rae plays the role of the object of Eminem's affection and hostility. As often is the case with Eminem, you have to choose between whether to like him as a gifted artist or despise him as a hateful person. Superman, unlike most of Eminem's music, isn't musically likable enough to let you overlook his deficiencies. I don't really understand why Superman was released as a single(and why the mediocre rock rap of Sing for The Moment is the next single) when The Eminem Show has so many good songs(I would vote for one of the Hailie songs). And why isn't the fun, loose title track from 8 Mile a single? The main appeal of Superman is the insight it gives into a messed up brain. If you believe the lyrics, Eminem's experiences have made him so fearful and paranoid that he's doomed to shallow, unsatisfying relationships.

Eminem - Without Me    Weeks on Chart: 18  Peak: # 4 (July 2002)   buy it!
The anticipated first single from The Enimen Show is no disappointment unless you expect Marshall to suddenly become mature. Like most of Eminem's work, Without Me is a mix of good music, very strong rap technique and lyrics that are simultaneously smart, stupid, interesting, offensive and ridiculous. Musically, Without Me is as impressive as anything he's ever done. Without Me is a little like The Real Slim Shady but it's tougher and sharper. Dr. Dre has wisely dropped the broad, cartoonish sound he used on Slim Shady and other songs in favor of an austere sound that's mostly just a driving beat. Eminem's rap is amazingly tight. He doesn't seem to take a breath as the words race out of his mouth. Aided by Dre's menacing touches, Eminem is more aggressive and focused than ever but he still displays the distinctive personality and his words still flow smoothly. Without Me has Eminem's usual mix of rants, good jokes and idiocy. While his negative image is largely self inflicted and has undoubtedly sold records, Eminem's paranoia is somewhat justified. It's hard to argue with his premise that the same media that "try to shut me down" likes it when his controversial acts give them material. But Eminem shows the same anger over trivial grievances as substantial ones. Calling Moby a "36 year old baldheaded fag" seems like a strained effort to be provocative by obviously showing he's still homophobic. Given the issues he could address, dissing N Sync again seems like a waste. Eminem shows his skills at packing in a lot of topics so we also get Eminem cursing his mother out for suing him, his backhanded boast that he uses "black music so selfishlessly", "to get myself wealth" and a reference to Malcolm McLaren's Buffalo Girls. Without Me is another look at Eminem's often foolish, self centered worldview but also another interesting, musically compelling work.

Enrique Igleias - Bailamos    Weeks on Chart: 9  Peak: # 27 (Sept. 1999)   buy it!
With every hit the mainstream success of Latin  music is looking more like a trend than a fluke. The first pop hit from Julio's kid is on the soundtrack of Wild, Wild West. Iglesias' call to dance is a weird mix of traditional Spanish flamenco and sleek, cheesy pop.

Enrique Iglesias - Be With You    Weeks on Chart: 15  Peak: # 28 (June 2000)   buy it!
Be With You is pretty generic, if effective, dance music. Iglesias' voice rides fairly effectively with the cold, steady beat though he sounds a little uncomfortable when his singing is rushed(perhaps electronically) to keep up with the beat. Iglesias is generally presented as a macho guy. I don't get why the lyrics make him seem like such a pathetic loser. Iglesias sings about his tears, how his life is meaningless without her and how the sound of her voice could save his soul.

Enrique Iglesias - Escape    Weeks on Chart: 11  Peak: # 16 (April 2002)   buy it!
Enrique Iglesias follows the big, empty soaring ballad Hero with an empty, generic dance pop song. Iglesias' American success is apparently attributable to his genial, unchallenging music and exotic hunkiness. The video for the title track and second single from Iglesias' Escape CD emphasizes Iglesias' looks by pairing him with exotic babe Anna Kournikova. Escape is pleasant enough but it basically has no personality. Escape has a decent if familiar guitar riff but also has an uninteresting, very programmed beat and innocuous synth sounds. Like on most of his English language work, Iglesias doesn't sound completely comfortable. He seems handcuffed by the tight, synthetic production and tentative in some of his English pronounciations. I do like the end of Escape when Iglesias gets a rare chance to let loose with a falsetto repeating "you can run." Iglesias predicts on Escape that, even if she leaves now, his partner will want to come back to a relationship that "was good, it was bad but it was real."

Enrique Iglesias - Hero    Weeks on Chart: 14  Peak: # 18 (Dec. 2001)   buy it!
Hero, from Iglesias' Escape CD, is another song that's found a September 11 connection. Some TV stations used it with footage of World Trade Center rescuers and Iglesias sang it at one of the benefit shows. Hero is actually a sappy love song with Iglesias selflessly offering to be a romantic savior. Iglesias slowly and seriously intones the lyrics, sounding a little like he's pronouncing them phonetically. The music starts fairly minimally but builds to an unsubtle conclusion with big, sweeping strings. That said, Hero isn't as cheesy and synthetic sounding as much of Iglesias' English language work. It does what it's supposed to with emotional romance novel imagery of an exotic Latin lover that's bound to appeal to millions of women.

Enrique Iglesias - The Rhythm Divine    Weeks on Chart: 3  Peak: # 46 (Jan. 2000)   buy it!
The second hit from his Enrique CD is another calculated piece of dance pop with a little taste of genuine sounding Spanish guitar. Iglesias still doesn't sound totally comfortable singing in English though The Rhythm Divine is a little less cheesy than Bailamos. The lyrics about following a woman, knowing his charm and the music's seductiveness will make her his, are pretty slight.

Enya - Only Time    Weeks on Chart: 7  Peak: # 14 (Dec. 2001)   buy it!
Besides providing vaguely mystical sounding background music for commercials, soothing is what Enya's ultra-lite music does best. So it's not surprising that some have found that in a troubled time Only Time, from Enya's A Day Without Rain CD, has therapeutic qualities. Rather than being about time healing, Only Time's message is that the future is unpredictable so there's no point worrying about it. Only Time is potentially sleep inducing elevator music but it's also a striking, delicately gauzy example of Enya's usual ethereal formula of filtered voices, layered keyboards and polite, programmed beat.

Eric Clapton & B.B. King - Riding With The King    Weeks on Chart: 16  Peak: # 12 (July 2000)   buy it!
John Hiatt's Thing Called Love helped Bonnie Raitt's comeback and his Riding With The King seems to be doing the same for B.B. King. Riding With The King sounded like a blues classic when Hiatt first released it on the 1983 record of the same name. King's status as a king of the blues gives it added resonance. Clapton has admired King for years and worked with him before but Riding With The King is the first full length record they've done together. They keep Hiatt's good guitar riff but generally slow things down, leaving space for the two guitar masters to get their licks in. As they trade charmingly boastful lead vocals and share relaxed harmonies over a good bluesy piano, the old buddies sound like they're having a good time.

Eric Clapton - Superman Inside    Weeks on Chart: 13  Peak: # 22 (April 2001)   buy it!
I'm indifferent to Clapton's new age lyric about "gettin' closer to peace of mind" and finding the Superman inside but his "need to let it out" is matched in the music's buoyant mood. The new Reptile CD has good musicians including Billy Preston and Paul Carrack on keyboards. Superman Inside has the kind of loose, rollicking piano Preston did for the Rolling Stones. Clapton's recent singles have been so mellow and serious that it's good he's doing the kind of fun song he hasn't done much since Forever Man. Superman Inside has a big sound with slide guitar, backing vocals and Clapton confident's lead.

Evan and Jaron - Crazy For This Girl    Weeks on Chart: 10  Peak: # 38 (Feb. 2001)   buy it!
The most interesting thing about Evan and Jaron Lowenstein is that they're probably already the most successful Orthodox Jew twin brother singers in pop history. Crazy For This Girl owes some of its success to being on the second Dawson Creek's soundtrack CD. On Crazy For The Girl, which is also on their self titled CD, the boys have a smooth, sincere, clean cut sound as they sing about the girl they think about constantly who "don't know how I feel." The sound doesn't have much more edge than the teen pop boy bands. But like Hey Leonardo, another song by adults that was aimed at a young audience, Crazy For This Girl is a guilty pleasure. It's superficial but with catchy hooks and good, tight guitar riffs on the chorus.

Evanescence - Going Under    Weeks on Chart: 18  Peak: # 18 (Oct. 2003)   buy it!
Going Under doesn't have the mediocre raps that helped made Bring Me To Life sound like an odd Linkin Park tribute. Otherwise, Going Under is a lot like the hugely successful first single from the Arkansas band's Fallen CD. Once again, the band is wildly over the top. Shooting for a cold, futuristic sound, Evanescence throw together crunching guitar chords, atmospheric keyboard effects and Amy Lee's overdramatic art rock vocals as well as strings and layers of backup singing. Lee again sounds like a self important, hysterical version of Sarah McLachlan or Tori Amos. Brian Moody's sledge hammer guitar playing is pretty uninteresting and his short solo pretty awful. Hopefully the novelty value of Evanescence's theatrical music is fast ebbing and they're not a harbinger of a wave of female led melodramatic neo grunge bands. Going Under's lyric is slightly surprising. Lee sings about all the pain her lover has caused but also vows that she'll "save myself" and "won't be broken again."

Evanescence - My Immortal    Weeks on Chart: 23  Peak: # 16 (March 2004)   buy it!
My Immortal is the least irritating of the three chart hits from Evanescence's hugely successful Fallen CD. Bring Me To Life had rock guitar, rapping, goth touches and a big, atmospheric production. It gave the impression that the band was trying to please everyone and gave me a headache. On My Immortal, Evanescence are the sappy but effective folkie pop band I always thought they were under the rock trappings. It will be interesting to see if Evanescence can survive and thrive now that Ben Moody, who co-founded the band and cowrote all the songs on Fallen, has left. Whether she goes solo or stays with the band, singer Amy Lee will probably do fine. Lee has striking looks and a good voice. My Immortal again shows Lee to be a Tori Amos/Sarah McLachlan fan. My Immortal is reminiscent of simple, emotional, piano based Amos songs like Silent All These Years. Evanescence is unable to stay in a delicate Amos type mode for a whole song. My Immortal is more cliched than a good Tori Amos song. Its strings and the way the drums and guitars crash in for a climactic last run through the chorus make it more formulaic. But My Immortal generally maintains an appealing delicacy. Lee's singing is strong and not too showy. Her voice and simple piano playing easily carry the song. Evanescence have a preference for big, dramatic images. While it could be about an old boyfriend, My Immortal's lyric is apparently about being haunted by the memory of a dead lover whose "presence still lingers." The overripe emotion of Evanescence's songs, which millions have taken to, is too much for me. Heavy strings and Lee's painfully sincere vocal make My Immortal a bit precious. But Lee's intensity, her riveting presence and a direct, stripped down sound make My Immortal compelling.

Evanesence - Bring Me To Life    Weeks on Chart: 33  Peak: # 1 (May 2003)   buy it!
Evanescence is a Little Rock, Arkansas band started by former camp buddies Amy Lee and Ben Moody. Bring Me To Life is on the Daredevil soundtrack and Evanescence's Fallen CD. It was inevitable that someone would take the pop metal sound that's dominated rock music the last couple years and make it more glossy and even poppier. Bring Me To Life strikes me as one of the silliest hits of recent times. It brings to mind a bizarre mix of Linkin Park and the bloated Meat Loaf influenced hits Bonnie Tyler had in the early 80s. Bring Me To Life is also a touch gothic. Singer Amy Lee comes on like a spacier Sarah McLachlan though, to McLachlan's credit, she's never been as overdramatic as Lee is. With sweeping strings, crunching guitars, vaguely ominous synths and guest vocalist Paul McCoy playing Mike Shinoda(Linkin Park's rapper), Bring Me To Life throws in everything but the kitchen sink to make a hit. I can imagine how Bring Me To Life's over the top style could work on the soundtrack of a movie about a superhero but out of that context, it's ridiculously overblown. Bring Me To Life is fairly bad poetry. Lee appreciates how a guy can "see into my eyes like open doors leading you into my core" and asks him to wake her numb, soulless, sleeping spirit and "save me from the nothing I've become."

Eve 6 - Here's To The Night    Weeks on Chart: 15  Peak: # 32 (Aug. 2001)   buy it!
It's a cliche of contemporary rock for an otherwise tough band to include a slow song or two on their CD in an attempt at pop success. Here's To The Night stands out jarringly among the otherwise tough, somewhat unpleasant rock songs on Eve 6's Horrorscope CD. With its strings and pleasant but empty pop sound, Here's To The Night probably fits more comfortably on pop or easy listening radio. It resembles an 80's rock ballad like John Waite's Missing You. Max Collins tries to sounds to like a sensitive male but the lyrics, like many of Horrorscope, are pretty backward about women. Collins tells the woman he lied to, "don't let me let you go."

Eve 6 - On The Roof Again    Weeks on Chart: 6  Peak: # 24 (Nov. 2000)   buy it!
On The Roof Again is the second chart hit from Eve 6's Horrorscope CD. Keyboards and Jon Siebels' crunching guitar chords create an appropriately edgy feel for this tale of a young man easily pushed to desperation by romantic problems. As on much of Horrorscope, the band's ability to create exciting music is underminded by dopey, often offensive lyrics and unappealing great vocals. Max Collins strangely shows his sympathy for the jumper by repeatedly singing "your heinous highness broke her hymen."

Eve 6 - Promise    Weeks on Chart: 17  Peak: # 10 (Sept. 2000)   buy it!
In a rock world dominated by classic rock retreads, overblown gothic rock and harsh rap hybrids, Eve 6's music is refreshingly straight forward. They're not original or brilliant though not quite as mindless as similar bands like Lit. Promise, from their Horrorscope CD, is a solid, modest rocker. It's not as irresistably hook filled as their radio hit Inside Out. Promise, like Leech and Tongue Tied from their debut, is likable power pop. Max Collins makes modest promises to his girlfriend, swearing he won't try to mess with her head or let her down, won't mind if she decides to leave and won't look her in the eyes and lie. The big guitar chords help the promises go down easily.

Eve 6 - Think Twice    Weeks on Chart: 8  Peak: # 31 (Aug. 2003)   buy it!
The sure touch that brought Eve 6 hits on their first two records(Inside Out on Eve 6 and Here's To The Night on Horrorscope) has apparently eluded them on the new It's All In Your Head CD. Max Collins does some annoying, cliched self dramatizing rock singing. He starts by slowly and meaningfully intoning every syllable in a style Weezer mocked on their sweater song. The songs shifts to an anonymous chorus with slamming power chords. Then it speeds up a bit with Jon Siebels playing a decent scratchy guitar sound. Think Twice starts to sound a liitle like Inside Out but without that song's intensity. Generally Think Twice lacks Inside Out's energy and excitement. In an inevitable climax, Collins ends up screaming but Inside Out never gets interesting. I find it so boring that it's a struggle to listen all the way through. Think Twice has a pretty unpleasant lyric. Collins partly tries to convince his lady that his love is better than a rival's. But Think Twice is mostly a thuggish warning to the rival that if he touches her "I'll let you feel the burn."

Eve featuring Alicia Keys - Gangsta Lovin'    Weeks on Chart: 15  Peak: # 18 (Oct. 2002)   buy it!
Eve's new CD is called Eve-Olution. Gangsta Lovin' has the same kind of easy, likably playful sound as Eve's first big pop hit Let Me Blow Ya Mind. Ja Rule/Ashanti producer Irv Gotti gave Gangsta Lovin' a good sound with a steady, relaxed beat and a catchy synth riff. Eve's rap is appealingly confident and straight forward. She's strong and subtly teasing as she tells a guy she's interested. Alicia Keys' vocal on the chorus is assisted by backing singers and hardly challenging but her smooth, laid back singing fits Gangsta Lovin's charming, breezy mood.

Everclear - AM Radio    Weeks on Chart: 5  Peak: # 24 (Oct. 2000)   buy it!
Art Alexakis has sung about growing in a black neighborhod but his music has always been very white. For his most danceable single so far, rather than looking to contemporary hip hop, Alexakis borrows from Jean Knight's Mr. Big Stuff, a song from the early 70's when white and black music was more frequently heard on the same station. The lyrics claim that the time before VCRs, DVD and the internet was better. Alexakis' nostalgia is kind of sweet but it's also consistent with Everclear's general unwillingness to significantly alter their sound. That's not such a bad thing since their formula is likable. The band creates a good groove, with Greg Eklund's good drumming and catchy oscillating keyboards on the chorus. Still, on the Learning How To Smile CD, everything sounds like an Everclear song and that can be too much, especially on their cover of Brown Eyed Girl.

Everclear - The Boys are Back in Town    Weeks on Chart: 2  Peak: # 47 (Sept. 1999)   buy it!
From the soundtrack of the movie Detroit Rock City, Everclear's cover of Thin Lizzy's classic rock standard is a good example of the band's charm. It's melodic but still rocks. It's nicer than the original but keeps moving.

Everclear - When It All Goes Wrong Again    Weeks on Chart: 12  Peak: # 13 (Dec. 2000)   buy it!
AM Radio, the second single from Learning How To Smile, the first volume of Songs From An American Movie, has just followed Wonderful to top 40 radio. It will have to compete for airplay with the first single from the new CD: volume two, Good Time For A Bad Attitude. A lot of Everclear's music sounds alike. When It All Goes Wrong Again sounds like Santa Monica and You Make Me Feel Like A Whore, from Sparkle and Fade. Still, it's a good formula. Everclear create an exciting, full sound. Everclear songs, like Wonderful, often start quietly and build to an intense finish. When It All Goes Wrong Again, has an energized sound from start to finish with big drums and guitar chords. Art Alexakis sings and, as usual, screams in the end that he's not afraid of life's inevitable downturns and, in fact, relishes facing his next crisis.

Everclear - Wonderful    Weeks on Chart: 22  Peak: # 1 (Aug. 2000)   buy it!
Everclear has two new CDs released under the name Songs From An American Movie. The single version of Wonderful is from Volume One: Learning How To Smile. After disclosing some of his life story on So Much For The Afterglow's Father of Mine, Art Alexakis shares more on Wonderful and his story about the effect his parents' breakup had on him is pretty touching. Alexakis sings as an angry youth who wants his life to be the same as it used to be and doesn't want people to insult him by saying things are fine now. The music resembles I Will Buy You a New Life and other Everclear songs, starting quietly then building in force with undulating keyboards, power chords and Alexakis' screamed no's. However, the mellower start is a little longer and sadder than usual, consistent with the sad tone of the song.

Everlast - Black Jesus    Weeks on Chart: 11  Peak: # 18 (Oct. 2000)   buy it!
Black Jesus is from Everlast's Eat At Whitey's CD. On What It's Like and Ends, Everlast preached about the hardships faced by needy and troubled people. Black Jesus is a natural extension of that persona, with Everlast toying with the image of being a messiah. Everlast's dramatic, unadorned presentation is striking. However, I find him self important and repetitive, especially after a few listens when his message becomes clear.

Everlast - I Can't Move    Weeks on Chart: 8  Peak: # 27 (Feb. 2001)   buy it!
On I Can't Move, the second chart hit from the Eat At Whitey's CD, Everlast's subject matter is typically serious. He wants to face the outside world, claims he isn't scared then he's paralyzed by fear. The music and Everlast's delivery are also serious but not quite as heavy and solemn as on Everlast's last few singles. The music is pretty cool with Everlast's acoustic and a good beat.

Eve - Let Me Blow Ya Mind    Weeks on Chart: 17  Peak: # 29 (Sept. 2001)   buy it!
Eve's two solo records have been huge sellers but Let Me Blow Ya Mind is her first pop radio hit. Like the songs on the Scorpion CD with Teena Marie and Bob Marley's kids, Let Me Blow Ya Mind matches Eve with a mellower performer. No Doubt's Return Of Saturn didn't do too well but Gwen Stefani is doing great as a supporting player, following her work on Moby's South Side with nice, playful harmonizing on Let Me Blow Ya Mind. Stefani and the easy music soften Eve's good but harsh rap, which boasts and disses, warning competitors that it takes "a lot more than you to get rid of me." Let Me Blow Ya Mind was produced by Dr. Dre. He uses a cartoonish synth like he did on his own records and on Eminem and Snoop Dogg's. Let Me Blow Ya Mind has a likable, smooth feel and a relaxed beat.

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