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All-Reviews.com Top 50 Songs*:
for the 2nd week of September, 2000

*based on airplay at alternative, pop and rock radio stations a cross the nation (reviews by LarryG)

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  1. Three Doors Down-Kryptonite    (unchanged)      buy it!
    This surprise hit from the young Mississippi band is nothing new. It kind of sounds like the classic rock staple Radar Love. Still, Kryptonite, from the band's Better Life CD, has an easy, unpretentious charm and a good blues rock feel. Brad Arnold's lyrics are slight but charming and heartfelt. He sings about having a troubled mind and needing reassurance that his lover will stand by his side, asking "if I go crazy, will you still call me Superman?"

  2. Everclear-Wonderful    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Everclear has two new CDs released under the name Songs From An American Movie. The single version of Wonderful is from Volume One: Learning How To Smile. After disclosing some of his life story on So Much For The Afterglow's Father of Mine, Art Alexakis shares more on Wonderful and his story about the effect his parents' breakup had on him is pretty touching. Alexakis sings as an angry youth who wants his life to be the same as it used to be and doesn't want people to insult him by saying things are fine now. The music resembles I Will Buy You a New Life and other Everclear songs, starting quietly then building in force with undulating keyboards, power chords and Alexakis' screamed no's. However, the mellower start is a little longer and sadder than usual, consistent with the sad tone of the song.

  3. Creed-With Arms Wide Open    (up 3 positions)      buy it!
    There probably will always be a demand for big, pretentious arena rock. Rock radio moved on to With Arms Wide Open as Higher, the longest running song on the chart with more than eleven months in the top 50, crossed over to pop radio. With Arms Wide Open is another sweeping and basically empty ballad. Scott Stapp copped Eddie Vedder's serious intensity and delivers it with even less of a sense of humor. With Arms Wide Open has the band's typical big guitars and oh so serious vocals. At least, the subject matter is more appealing than Stapp's usual religious tirades. He actually sounds a little humble as he welcomes his baby to the world.

  4. Red Hot Chili Peppers-Californication    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Do we really need another serious, sensitive single from the Chili Peppers? Scar Tissue was a very good song but I could do without their other recent displays of maturity. Californication is the fourth chart hit from the CD of the same name. Anthony Kiedis intones the lyrics so seriously that you'd think he was the first person to notice the shallowness of Hollywood life. His indictment is fairly predictable in pointing out that people are seduced and then exploited in their search for glamour and(taking a shot at Courtney Love) that plastic surgery and other tools create an arifticial world. The music is a little bland but John Frusciante has a good, sad guitar riff.

  5. Stone Temple Pilots-Sour Girl    (unchanged)      buy it!
    STP showed their rock cred with the first couple chart songs from STP's No. 4 CD, Down and Heaven and Hot Rods. Both were pretty hard and both fell off the chart pretty quickly. The band should have more success with Sour Girl which shows the band's pop skills with restrained guitars and keyboards. It starts like a Van Halen midtempo song with a steady, thumping bass and drifts easily to a chorus with sweet harmonies. Sour Girl is frothy and slight but hard to resist. Scott Weiland sings about a relationship that was doomed from the start with a woman who seems happier without him and his problems putting it behind him. Hopefully the line "what would you do if I followed you" doesn't mean that Weiland has a problem with stalking to go with his drug problem.

  6. Vertical Horizon-You're A God    (up 1 position)      buy it!
    Like Tonic and other similar bands shooting for the airwaves, Vertical Horizon basically make generic pop rock with vaguely troubled lyrics. They don't even have the personality of the kings of the genre, Matchbox 20. While not as distinctive as Everything You Want, the hit title track from their CD, You're a God is perkier and catchy in a repetitive way. However, the lyrics, about being covered with lies leave a nasty aftertaste as Matt Scannell tells the woman he's dumping that he's not worthy of her.

  7. Papa Roach-Last Resort    (up 4 positions)      buy it!
    Papa Roach is the latest hip hop informed hard rock band with an anguished young male. Coby Dick's yelling that he's suffocating on Last Resort, from the Infest CD, does nothing for me but the kids might appreciate him singing about how he's "losing my sight, losing my mind, won't somebody tell me I'm fine" and how he can't go on living this way. The assautive guitar is harsh but strong and incisive.

  8. Barenaked Ladies-Pinch Me    (unchanged)      buy it!
    One Week, from BNL's Stunt CD, gave the band their first taste in the U.S. of the huge success they've long enjoyed in their native Canada. Pinch Me, from the Maroon CD, doesn't have One Week's irresistable supercharged momentum. Pinch Me is more reflective of the band's typical modest, likable style. Ed Robertson is usually more unassuming than the band's other singer, Steven Page. However, Robertson did the lightning fast rap on One Week and he similarly races smoothly through parts of Pinch Me, providing a good dynamic shift from the song's generally mellow mood. Robertson is appealing even when playing a guy who lives in a dream world because in the real world, "everything's a mess." Pinch Me has quirky charm, like the non sequitor line, "I just made you say underwear" plus a happy ending of sorts with Robertson's character tentatively deciding to "try to figure out what all this is for" and "try to see the world beyond your front door."

  9. Three Doors Down-Loser    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Kryptonite, the hit from Three Doors Down's Better Life CD, has a fairly depressing lyric but it also has a light musical touch and a charmingly simple, unshowy sound. It rocks but without the lugubrious, heavy feeling of so much rock music these days. Loser is less interesting, more standard rock radio fare. Like their peers, on Loser, Three Doors Down take the serious, intense rock ballads of Alice In Chains and Pearl Jam and remake them with less personality. Loser has the formula down with serious vocals and intense acoustic verses leading to choruses with big electric guitars. They really overdo it on the bridge with big classic rock chords, for no particular reason. The lyrics are yet another mordant tale of a young man pushed to the edge. Brad Arnold sings that a woman is "getting close to pushing me off life's little ledge." The only positive note is that he also realizes "someday this will fall away" and he'll find "a love that flows through me."

  10. Eve 6-Promise    (unchanged)      buy it!
    In a rock world dominated by classic rock retreads, overblown gothic rock and harsh rap hybrids, Eve 6's music is refreshingly straight forward. They're not original or brilliant though not quite as mindless as similar bands like Lit. Promise, from their Horrorscope CD, is a solid, modest rocker. It's not as irresistably hook filled as their radio hit Inside Out. Promise, like Leech and Tongue Tied from their debut, is likable power pop. Max Collins makes modest promises to his girlfriend, swearing he won't try to mess with her head or let her down, won't mind if she decides to leave and won't look her in the eyes and lie. The big guitar chords help the promises go down easily.

  11. Matchbox 20-Bent    (down 8 positions)      buy it!
    It's hard to imagine, but since Matchbox 20's debut CD Yourself or Someone Like You sold eleven million copies and Smooth was the biggest single of 1999, Rob Thomas is probably the most successful rock singer around these days. With its appealingly familiar, slightly adventurous and mildly rocking sound, Bent, the first single from the Mad Season CD, keeps the string of success going. Thomas' lyrics are typically cliched and his vocals emotive as he again plays the beleaguered male. At least he's not dreaming of pushing a woman around and taking her for granted as he asks his lady to pick him up, dust him off and be his breath so he can walk. The music does have a good atmospheric edge and restrained mood.

  12. Fuel-Hemorrhage    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Fuel broke through with Shimmer, from their Sunburn CD. That song had a hard rock sound and was catchy but didn't seem too gimmicky. Hemorrhage, from the new Something Like Human CD, doesn't have Shimmer's light touch. With its dramatic strings and acoustic guitar, Hemorrhage is calculated to be a smash hit rock ballad. Brett Scallions is ever so intense as he sings Carl Bell's bombastic lyrics asking her not to leave love bleeding in my his hands, as if Elton John and many others hadn't thought of the image before.

  13. The Deftones-Change (In the House of Flies)    (unchanged)      buy it!
    The Deftones like guitar noise as much as their hard rock contemporaries but they do seem to have a little more imagination. Change, from the White Pony CD, has big guitars but the dense sound also has an interesting trippy feel that matches the lyrics about watching someone turn into a fly.

  14. A Perfect Circle-Judith    (unchanged)      buy it!
    A Perfect Circle was formed by Tool frontman Maynard James Keenan and Tool guitar tech Billy Howerdel. A Perfect Circle's debut CD is called Mer De Noms. Judith's music is similar to much of Tool's. It's slightly less dense but it's still grinding, jagged and intense. Keenan has always reminded me of Sugar and Husker Du's Bob Mould in the way his anger seems so uncontrollable that he seems on the verge of a breakdown. On Judith, Keenan's screaming vents his rage at christianity. He tries to talk a woman out of an attitude where she feels she's brought on her problems through her sins, yelling "it's not like you killed someone."

  15. Third Eye Blind-Deep Inside Of You    (up 13 positions)      buy it!
    Third Eye Blind try to make music that can fit on as many radio formats as possible from easy listening to alternative. So it's not surprising that they follow the punky Anything and mainstream rocker Never Let You Go with a pop ballad from their Blue CD. Deep Inside Of You is like their first record's How's It Gonna Be, pleasant and sincere but a little boring. Stephan Jenkins sings about loving a woman who's messing up his life.

  16. Metallica-I Disappear    (unchanged)      buy it!
    I Disappear is from the Mission Impossible 2 soundtrack. Their S&M live CD loosened up their sound a little and added some melody with the help of a symphony orchestra. I Disappear is a return to their typical humorless, harsh guitar driven sound. The lyrics are as depressing as ever with James Hetfield's angry vocals about how he suffers and that there's "no mercy left for me." It's a tough life apparently. "Just as soon as I belong then it's time I disappear."

  17. Vast-Free    (up 3 positions)      buy it!
    Free, from the Music For People, CD is fairly standard hard rock. On the verses, heavy metal guitar chords and Jon Crosby's yelled vocals about the unnamed people who hold him down and it being "time to be what I need to be" are pretty overblown. The choruses, with Crosby singing "you can't tell me what to do anymore" do have the soaring appeal of a good Ozzy Osbourne song or 70's art rock.

  18. Incubus-Stellar    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Like Pardon Me, Incubus' hit from the Make Yourself CD, Stellar is hard rock with a bit of an unusual edge. Stellar has jazzy, psychedelic verses that give way to harder, guitar driven choruses. Brandon Boyd sings about being amazed by his lover asking, how do you do it, and equating having sex with her with the sensation of being in outer space.

  19. 8Stops7-Question Everything    (down 2 positions)      buy it!
    In the hands of today's hard rockers the rock ballad, especially when it involves a white young male trying to figure out what it all means, is a form that's doomed to an overdone combination of wildly dramatic singing and big guitars to keep the young males interested. Question Everything is the followup to Satisfied, 8Stop7's chart debut from the In Moderation CD. The music isn't as overblown as it could have been. Evan Sula-Goff's vocals are very serious but appropriate for a song about deciding how to deal with an intolerant, unloving as he nears death and is no longer an imposing force.

  20. Fastball-You're An Ocean    (up 2 positions)      buy it!
    You're An Ocean is from the band's new Harsh Light Of Day CD. On The Way, Fire Escape and Out Of My Head, the hits from their All The Pain Money Can Buy CD, Fastball came across as good natured purveyors of upbeat, not terribly deep, pop rock. You're An Ocean's music has an especially light, happy feel, thanks to Billy Preston's rollicking piano. You're An Ocean is basically about taking the bad with the good in a relationship. Tony Scalzo sings about his vulnerablility in "a stormy sea of love and emotion." He's in suspended motion with his heart in her hands but he'd still "buy whatever you would sell."

  21. Green Day-Minority    new to music chart      buy it!
    Fans who were concerned with the maturity Billie Joe Armstrong showed on Time Of Your Life from the Nimrod CD can be reassured by Minority, the first single from the Warning CD. Minority has the likably simple feel that made Green Day a huge success on their Dookie CD. Billie Joe sings that he doesn't want to be a conformist and is happy to stand alone.

  22. SR-71-Right Now    (down 1 position)      buy it!
    Right Now is from the band's debut Now You See Inside CD. SR-71, named for a military stealth aircraft, are the latest band to follow Green Day in making fast, punky pop. Right Now has appealing energy and a good guitar riff. However, its appeal is limited by its mediocre vocals and dopey lyrics. Especially in Mitch Allan's bratty singing, Right Now is reminiscent of the sloppy, speedy mindlessly fun songs the Goo Goo Dolls do when bass player Robby Takac gets to sing lead. The male teens will probably appreciate the immature tale of a guy who used to worship his girlfriend and "hang on every word" but now, feeling taking advantage of, he's just going to use her until something better comes along.

  23. Disturbed-Stupify    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Stupify is from Disturbed's Sickness CD. Stupify starts with a promise of a mix of hard rock and rap like Rage Against The Machine and Limp Bizkit. It soon degenerates into an unpleasant rage from singer David Draiman, who calls himself a sick animal. The harsh, menacing mood is apparently the appeal of Stupify but the sound certainly doesn't have the full, overwhelming power of bands like Nine Inch Nails. The hard edged guitars and electronics seem a little thin at times. The first verse is an excuse for Draiman to repeatedly spit out a profanity that Gordon Gano of Violent Femmes used more interestingly on Add It Up, telling us he just wanted to have sex once. Because of Draiman's nasty delivery, I don't really care that he lives his life in a daze, his sense of reality slipping and that he's breaking down.

  24. Foo Fighters-Next Year    new to music chart      buy it!
    With the exception of the very good Learn To Fly, most of the rockers on There Is Nothing Left To Lose are fairly routine. Two slow songs, Ain't It The Life and Next Year, are among the most interesting on the CD. Next Year has a good dreamy atmosphere. Strings give it the feel of a thoughtful late Beatles ballad. The lyrics seem to use a trip into space to represent a break in a relationship that will make things all better.

  25. Destiny's Child-Jumpin' Jumpin'    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Destiny's Child's Writing's On The Wall CD has produced a ton of R & B hits. Jumpin' Jumpin' is their second big pop hit after Say My Name. I found Say My Name repetitive and draggy. Jumpin' Jumpin' is considerably more lively. It has a nonstop, frantic energy with a good, crisp beat and staccato keyboard notes underlining the vocals. Jumpin' Jumpin' is hardly weighty but it has a positive feel to go with its lyrics inviting men and women to leave their partners for a night and go to a happening club.

Songs 26-50


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