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All-Reviews.com Top 50 Songs*:
for the 3rd week of November, 2002

*based on airplay at alternative, pop and rock radio stations a cross the nation (reviews by LarryG)

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(songs 1-25)

  1. Good Charlotte-Lifestyles Of The Rich And Famous    (up 6 positions)      buy it!
    I like twin brothers Joel and Benji, Good Charlotte's singer and guitar player, as hosts of MTV's All Things Rock. They're pleasant, self deprecating and not too stupid. I certainly prefer them to the blond bimbo who seems to have replaced them. But Good Charlotte's good nature isn't enough to make me like the single from their The Young and The Hopeless CD. Lifestyles Of The Rich And Famous feels a little stale. Wasn't the tv show the song's named after on more than 20 years ago? And the choices of famous people to exemplify famous person misbehavior, O.J. Simpson and Marion Barry, aren't exactly fresh. Lifestyles also suffers musically from similarity to other poppy punksters. If anything distinguishes Lifestyles from recent hits by New Found Glory, Sum 41, I'm missing it. With big, upbeat drums, high energy vocals and a catchy chorus, Lifestyles is pleasant and easy to listen to, like a perky cover band's version of Iggy's Lust For Life but it's so unimaginative and unoriginal that it barely gets my attention. Lifestyles Of The Rich And Famous has the punky/Robin Hood premise that since the rich and famous are self pitying, they deserve to be taught a lesson by having their mansions burglarized or being forced to live on the street. It doesn't address how a modicum of fame and riches will effect Good Charlotte though, in their defense, I don't think they'll be "always complaining." Good Charlotte seem like nice guys. Too bad their single's music and lyrics aren't more interesting.

  2. Taproot-Poem    (up 8 positions)      buy it!
    Poem is from the Michigan band's Welcome CD. Poem, made with Korn/Alice In Chains/Sevendust producer Toby Wright, has a state of the art sound. It's also like a lot of today's hard rock. Poem's driving, threatening guitar sound and touches of staccato and grunted vocal are reminiscent of Disturbed's angry, aggravating music. In general, Poem is familiar, edgy contemporary rock. Michael DeWolf's big, slashing guitar is, like the song, competent and hard rocking, but not particularly interesting. The only thing about Poem that gets my attention at all is Stephen Richards' vocal on the chorus which, especially when underlined by harmonies, has the rock theatricality of a singer like Alice In Chains' Layne Staley. Like so many rockers these days, Richards sings about his pain, telling us about an "overbearing panic attack" and a feeling that he's drowning. Poem apparently is about a bad breakup. Its good news is that the song "helps me to live."

  3. Jennifer Lopez-Jenny From The Block    (up 3 positions)      buy it!
    Jenny From The Block is the first single from Lopez This Is MeThen CD. Jenny From The Block is Lopez latest proclamation of realness but she apparently had no significant role in writing it. Jenny From The Block seems inspired by a marketing persons belief that Lopez can only remain a huge star if, despite her ambition, success and high profile romances, people think shes a regular gal. In that regard, Jenny From The Block strikes me as unsuccessful. Placed along side repeated brags about the rocks that I got, Lopez claim that I know where I came from is meaningless. More importantly, Jenny From The Block, has the light, relaxed sound thats given her an impressive string of hits. Lopez thin voice is again wrapped by backing vocals and studio effects but her nearly spoken vocal also projects a straight forward confidence the audience can connect with. With an inobtrusive, steady beat and perky flute effect, the music isnt novel but it is smooth and likable. A brief, big beat break giving props to Lopez former South Bronx home adds a touch of flavor and seamlessly fits Jenny From The Blocks catchy dance pop. Jenny From The Block has an assembly line quality that undermines its statement of genuineness and keeps it from being particularly interesting but it also guarantees Lopez another hit.

  4. Nelly featuring Kelly Rowland-Dilemma    (down 5 positions)      buy it!
    Dilemma is the Nellyville CD's ballad. I'd have thought that doing a tame, kind of sensitive song would hurt Nelly's tough guy rep but I guess he's done enough songs objectifying women and establishing his gangsta cred that Dilemma won't hurt his image much. Nelly competently works in a much more restrained mode than usual. Like his rapping, Nelly's singing is easy and fluid but he's so quiet and subdued that he's upstaged by Destiny's Child's Kelly Rowland. Nelly doesn't get to express his usual arrogance but Dilemma does stroke his ego. Rowland plays a woman who's with another man but is crazy over Nelly and always thinks about him. Nelly's character plays it cool, listening and waiting for his cue to make his move. Nelly has followed Hot In Herre, his first #1 pop hit, with another sure hit. Dilemma is based on a Patti Labelle song written by Kenny Gamble and Bunny Sigler. It has a classic, relaxed sound with a crisp, easy beat. Rowland's good, straight forward vocal is nicely underlined by inobtrusive chiming synths. The repeated "oh" sample reminds me of the version of This Woman's Work by Maxwell, a smooth singer I'd never think I'd compare to Nelly.

  5. Creed-One Last Breath    (down 1 position)      buy it!
    I should know by now not to underestimate Creed. I figured, after My Sacrifice fell off the chart quicker than the hits from Creed's Human Clay's CD, that people might be getting tired of Creed's bloated, ultraserious sound. In fact, while it won't have Higher or With Arms Wide Open's longevity, One Last Breath is Creed's first #1 song. Radio still loves their generic, soaring, meaningful sounding music. On One Last Breath, Scott Stapp admits he's screwed up and doesn't show the self righteous arrogance he has on previous hits. His clenched fist intensity is still way too much. One Last Breath, the third chart hit from the Weathered CD, starts O.K. Stapp sings with just a quiet guitar and then a subdued guitar, drums and strings. Inevitably, the sound intensifies and any subtlety is bludgeoned by heavy rock guitars and drums and Stapp's pained howl. Stapp uses his big, melodramatic imagery to say how bad life's become. He's close to the edge and "I think I'm falling." He's cried out to heaven "save me" but this time he's apparently looking for help from a woman not God.

  6. Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers-The Last DJ    (down 3 positions)      buy it!
    The Last DJ, the title track from Tom Petty's new CD, overstates things a little. There are still plenty of djs at college and independent stations who play "what they want to play" and say "what they want to say." And the fact that most stations are guided by the bottom line, rather than a quest for quality, is hardly news. The Ramones, Kinks and Elvis Costello long ago did songs about it. For at least the 25 years of Petty's career, commercial radio has rarely welcomed dj free expression. Market research and pandering play the role in music they do in the selling of movies, tv shows or political candidates though audience tastes sometimes force commercial radio to abandon its conservative instincts and play new, good or different kinds of music. The undeniable subtext of The Last DJ is the unlamentable fact that pop radio no longer plays the music of Petty and some of his contemporaries. The similarity of Last DJ to Petty's other music hardly argues against classic rock radio as the natural 2002 home for his music. Still, I agree it's sad that radio is controlled by large corporations and consultants who "celebrate mediocrity", pushing songs meant to sound like other hits and appeal to the lowest common denominator rather than good, smart or interesting music. And while The Last DJ is familiar, it's one of my favorite current songs. Petty's nasal whine is comforting and he sounds like he still has something to prove. The Heartbreakers' personnel has changed over the years but guitar player Mike Campbell is still giving Petty's songs some kick. Campbell keeps playing Rickenbacker riffs he stole from Roger McGuinn and The Byrds. He gives The Last DJ's verses texture and a good countermelody and adds urgency to the chorus with compact, crunching London Calling style chords. Longtime Heartbreaker Benmont Tench's piano helps fill out the sound and adds to Last DJ's vibrancy.

  7. Kelly Clarkson-A Moment Like This    (down 7 positions)      buy it!
    After Kelly Clarkson won American Idol, A Moment Like This was rushed out as a single, long before an album was ready, and it's one of the biggest selling singles in recent years. I didn't see much of American Idol. It seemed irrelevant to me and millions others. From what I can tell, there were few signs that rock or hip hop exist. Balladeers competed to show over the top intensity. It's not surprising that Clarkson won. I'd figure the person who would appeal to most average Americans would sing competently, sound very familiar and not be too challenging or unusual. Clarkson has been compared to Mariah Carey. The comparison seems accurate. She doesn't seem as skilled or distinctive as Carey but Clarkson has Carey's confidence as well as her tendency to slightly overdo things. Comfortable familiarity seems like the main goal of American Idol, Clarkson and especially the writers of A Moment Like This, which blatantly borrows pieces of Whitney Houston's ballads. A Moment Like This' resemblance to I Will Always You, The Greatest Love Of All(which it namedrops) and others practically makes it a medley of Whitney's hits. Especially in the big finish final verse, every move seems copped from I Will Always Love You though you can also credit Elton's Circle Of Life and Bette Midler's big hits. A Moment Like This, written and produced by studio pros who have worked with a bunch of lightweight British pop stars as well as Britney and O Town, has a by the book arrangement. The music starts quietly and gains in intensity, with a cushion of backup singers and strings. There will probably always be a market for uplifting, manipulative songs likely to end with the singer's arms raised triumphantly over her head. A Moment Like This is properly constructed to tug at the heartstrings but it doesn't have a transcendent vocal performance or anything unusual to distinguish it from other similar songs. A Moment Like This, with its "some people wait a lifetime for a moment like this" hook, was chosen because it seems to be commemorating Clarkson's victory. But the lyric is actually a clichi ridden love song about a perfect love.

  8. Bruce Springsteen & The E Street Band-Lonesome Day    (up 5 positions)      buy it!
    Bruce Springsteen's The Rising is a CD of varying quality. The music isn't always that interesting and sometimes Bruce's writing is too empty or cliched to provide the meaning he clearly seeks. But The Rising is mostly good and it often achieves a comforting, healing feel. 9/11 related imagery lurks throughout The Rising. The title track doesn't specifically cite 9/11 but its story of overcoming devastating circumstances, like much of The Rising, has that day and its aftermath in mind. Sometimes the quest for significance seems overreaching. Lonesome Day is first about trying to move on after being surprised when a woman he thought he "knew everything I needed to know about" leaves. Next thing you know, Bruce sings that the "house is on fire" and a "dark sun's on the rise" and suggests a need for revenge. Lonesome Day's lyrics may be murky but, as is often the case, Bruce's music and The E Street Band's playing suggest meaning deeper than provided by the words. The music brilliantly evoke sadness and rebirth. As the Lonesome Day moves at a cautious pace, Bruce's strong, ungimmicky vocal and Max Weinberg's solid whacks create a majestic, optimistic feel. That hopeful feeling is further bolstered by Roy Bittan and Danny Federici's nice, subtle keyboards, Clarence Clemons' brief, familiar solo and the good "it's alright" fadeout backing vocals. Lonesome Day's spare, uplifting sound brings to mind a good middle period song from John Mellancamp, one of Bruce's many disciples. It also has a sound that's right for an artist seeking a mature voice and meaning in a troubled time.

  9. Angie Martinez-If I Can Go    (unchanged)      buy it!
    I, like many in the New York area, haven't heard much of If I Can Go, the hit from Angie Martinez' Animal House CD. Martinez is a Hot 97 radio personality. Other stations have decided not to help a competitor, even if that means missing out on a hot song. It's Z-100's(among others') loss. If I Can Go is good, breezy dance pop with an easy, positive energy and a touch of a Latin feel. If I Can Go has a very catchy hook that repeats throughout over a crisp, simple beat. Producer Rick Rock smartly deploys the hook in different ways. A guitar riff is joined or replaced by a dramatic synth when emphasis is needed. Martinez doesn't seem to have great vocal skills but her hard, confident New Yorker voice helps give If I Can Go a tough edge. Lil' Mo effectively takes over when a real singer is needed. Sacario's quick, no nonsense rap is well integrated into If I Can Go. If I Can Go is about wanting to leave New York "with no cells and no trace" for a far away beach, if the guy who can "make you feel like you're right back in the ninth grade" can come.

  10. The Wallflowers-When Youre On Top    (up 1 position)      buy it!
    Jakob Dylans bands Bringing Down The Horse CD, which had the hit One Headlight, went multiplatinum. The Wallflowers success proved short lived. The Breach CD died after getting early radio interest, falling far short of its predecessors sales. When Youre On Top, off the Red Letter Days CD, is largely about wanting to get back with an ex but its also informed by Dylans new commercial reality. Dylans more modest expectations suit him on When Youre On Top. Jakob cant avoid that genetics and upbringing gave him a similar voice to dads. On When Youre On Top the resemblance in Dylans deliberate phrasing and nasal, slightly angry delivery suits him. Jakobs writing will never have the power of Bob Dylans best work but When Youre On Top is dense, rich and good. When Youre On Top is about being jaded and depressed. Bored by a life where hes making new friends but none of them matter, Dylan is looking for new experiences and a thought that I can believe in. Musically, When Youre On Top is a step in the right direction. In the past, The Wallflowers music has often been overly slick and shallow. When Youre On Top strips down the sound and finds a more interesting edge. The verses evoke disconnection, starting with no beat and a cold, throbbing synth then adding a stiff drum machine beat. The chorus is brighter and catchier but its restraint underlines Dylans theme that he feels fine and is doing better but not doing as well as when he was with the one he needs now more than ever.

  11. Rolling Stones-Don't Stop    (down 10 positions)      buy it!
    Don't Stop is one of four new songs on Forty Licks, which is billed as the first retrospective of the Stones' entire career. Knowing that people buying the two CD set or attending their concerts are mostly interested in their earlier music, Mick Jagger and Keith Richards don't seem to have exhausted themselves putting Don't Stop together. They certainly haven't repeated Jagger's attempt on last year's Goddess In The Doorway CD to distance himself from the classic Stones sound. There isn't much to Don't Stop. In comparison, Start Me Up is a complex puzzle. Still, there's something satisfying about Don't Stop's simplicity and familiarity. Don't Stop echoes better but similar feel good songs like Start Me Up, Happy, Honky Tonk Women and Tumbling Dice. Jagger wraps his big personality around Don't Stop. Like he does live, Jagger yells as much as sings but shows remarkable energy and warmth for a 59 year old. Richards and Ron Wood could probably play Don't Stop's guitar line in their sleep but their tight, jagged playing still creates a good edge. On Don't Stop, Jagger feels like his "baby" is peppering him "with poison darts" and is soon leaving him but he still asks her to share her "screams of passion" and kisses that draw blood.

  12. Daniel Bedingfield-Gotta Get Thru This    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Gotta Get Thru This is the title track from Daniel Bedingfield's first solo CD. It follows Dirty Vegas' Days Go By, The Wiseguys' Start The Commotion and Kylie Minogue's singles as the latest dance hit out of England with at least a touch of techno flavor. 22 year old Bedingfield says he made Gotta Get Thru This in his bedroom with a computer and a mike. Gotta Get Thru This's sound is basic, with a steady beat and a decent repeated electronic riff, but it's pretty effective. Bedingfield's voice is obviously treated and enhanced. The result is thin and nasal but interesting, like a cartoonish version of 80s Michael Jackson. Like the music, Gotta Get Thru This' lyric is simple but does the job. Bedingfield repeats the title like a mantra that helps him to stop obsessing about a woman who broke his heart.

  13. Missy Elliott-Work It    (up 11 positions)      buy it!
    After having her pop breakthrough with Get Ur Freak Out, one of the best singles of 2001, Missy Ellott has come back in 2002 with another great single thats an even bigger hit. Everything about Work It, from Elliotts Under Construction CD, is cool, smart and appealing smooth. Work It, produced by Timbaland, is ingenious. Tight editing, unrelenting music and Elliotts fast, fluid vocal create an irresistable urgency but Work It also feels relaxed and unrushed. Elliots rap is both confident and playful and unpretentious. Work It refreshingly presents a young woman whos overtly sexual but is neither a slut nor a maneater. Elliott knows that she doesnt look like a Halle Berry poster but shes lost a few pounds and knows her smarts accentuate her sexiness. Work Its sound, with emphatic sonic effects in place of naughty words and tape reverses, is appropriately loose and irreverent. Work It keeps moving with a sensual looped sample and a good, inobtrusive, percussion laced beat thats steady except for breaks allowing Elliott to emphasize key points. Like Eminems best 2002 work, Work It combines skilled technique, smart production and a confident persona, to make one of the best singles of the year.

  14. Norah Jones-Don't Know Why    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Come Away With Me is the debut CD by 23 year old Norah Jones, who is sitar legend Ravi Shankar's daughter but was raised in Texas by her mom. Come Away With Me has justifiably become a yuppie and boomer favorite. Like Cassandra Wilson, Jones starts from a jazz background but plays songs that can be categorized as folk, r&b and pop. Jones' voice even resembles that of country pop singer Shelby Lynne. Don't Know Why is a good showcase of Jones' unshowy but sultry charm. On Don't Know Why, Jones' voice is appealingly yearning and delicate. Jones' piano and rhythm section are easy and inobtrusive, adding to the song's understated poignance. Don't Know Why, written by Jones' guitar player Jesse Harris, has a classic simplicity. Jones sings that, while it makes her feel teary, empty and needing wine, she has to stay away from a guy who has never run to her.

  15. Pink-Family Portrait    (up 6 positions)      buy it!
    When her M!ssundaztood CD came out, Pink proclaimed that she was taking a huge chance by abandoning a safe musical formula. As its turned out, Pink just traded one radio friendly style for another slightly different one. In retrospect, the real chance Pink took was in filling M!ssundaztood with all kinds of biographical information. The risk has paid off. Pink was a fairly generic dance pop artist. Now she has a very identifiable image as feistily overcome obstacles life has thrown at her. Family Portraits success is the clearest sign yet that a large audience is willing to follow Pinks search for self discovery wherever it goes. Pinks previous hits were catchy enough that listeners could just have been tolerating the self expression because the music helped it go down easily. The only purpose of Family Portraits music is to accentuate the poignant mood and stay out of the way of Family Portraits story. Family Portrait is unadorned enough and apparently so much about Pink that much of its appeal must come from its vicarious look at Pinks youth. Family Portraits soap opera style piano brings Mary J. Bliges No More Drama to mind. But unlike that songs self dramatizing portrayal of not being dramatic, Family Portrait keeps things fairly subdued until pushing the emotional buttons by closing with a kiddie chorus. Family Portrait, with Pinks character feeling responsible for and trying to fix up her parents screwed up relationship, doesnt say anything about domestic strife that hasnt been said in dozens of TV movies but Pinks pained delivery sounds real enough that her simple portrayal of a dysfunctional family packs some emotional power, even with its cliches. Nothing about Family Portraits music gets my attention. And in conjunction with its video, with a tv commercial cute kid playing young Pink, Family Portrait is too much of an ego massage for my liking. But Pinks fans surely appreciate the chance to fill in her back story.

  16. Oakenfold-Starry Eyed Surprise    (down 1 position)      buy it!
    Paul Oakenfold is England's(and probably the world's) most sought after club DJ. He's also done well as a producer and remixer. The Bunkka CD is Oakenfold's most concerted effort at being a solo artist. On Bunkka, Oakenfold worked with a range of pop and hop hip singers. Starry Eyed Surprise's singer is Shifty Shellshock from Crazy Town, whose Butterfly was a hit a couple years back. Shellshock's hipster rap isn't that different from the one he did on Butterfly. In fact, you could easily fit big chunks of Butterfly into Starry Eyed Surprise. I found the psychedelic, spacy Butterfly, and Shellshock's slick, cocky vocal, annoying but I kind of like Starry Eyed Surprise. Starry Eyed Surprise is insubstantial and close to innocuous but it achieves the likable dance pop sound it shoots for. Starry Eyed Surprise has a genial tone and it's mostly about the music and the beat, so Shellshock isn't as irritating as he can be. Not surprisingly, Oakenfold delivers a strong, sturdy beat but he's also smart enough to keep the music relaxed, unhurried and fairly uncluttered. Oakenfold chose a few appealing riffs to keep things interesting, basing Starry Eyed Surprise on a piece of Nilsson's Everybody's Talkin'(from the Midnight Cowboy soundtrack). Starry Eyed Surprise's lyric is a dopey celebration of clubbing and dancin' "all night to this DJ."

  17. Kelly Rowland-Stole    new to music chart      buy it!
    With Beyonce Knowles in Destiny's Child and Nelly on the hit Dilemma(which appears on Nellyville and Kelly Rowland's Simply Deep CD) Rowland has allowed her costar to get most of the attention. Rowland has the spotlight to herself on Simply Deep but continues her unassuming ways. On Stole, Rowland's vocal is decent and unshowy. Stole is smooth and well made though not particularly distinctive. Stole was written and produced by industry pros Steve Kipner(who worked on Olivia Newton John's Physical and Christina Aguilera's Genie In A Bottle and many other hits) and Sean Hosein and Dave Deviller(O-Town and 98 Degrees among others). Stole has an easy mood with good, subtle ringing and scratching effects and guitar matching the climactic line about "playing angry chords." Stole effectively layers Rowland's voice with good backup singing. Stole is the latest song to address school shootings. We find out the shooter was the brightest kid in school but he was bullied and put down and didn't fit in. Stole means well. It's not offensive(unless you're a grammarian troubled that she doesn't say stolen) but it's even less insightful than P.O.D.'s Youth Of The Nation because its invented mass killing doesn't feel real. Stole tells us that one victim "could have been a movie star" and another would have "had a try out with the Sixers", as if Columbine-type deaths are less tragic if their victims weren't destined for stardom.

  18. Avril Lavigne-Complicated    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Complicated is from the 17 year old Canadian's Let Go CD. Even more than Michelle Branch and Vanessa Carlton, Lavigne has a sound that seems perfect for girls looking for a more substantial alternative to Britney and Christina. Unlike Branch, whose image is sincere and vulnerable, Lavigne comes across as very self confident. Her voice has a casual, spoken quality that sounds like that of a cool teen. Complicated is fairly insubstantial but it's also appealingly perky and direct. Complicated's confessional, relaxed tone marks Lavigne as an Alanis fan. There's also some resemblance to the more rocking but still poppy recent work of labelmate Pink. Some of Complicated's synth flourishes are unnecessary but the sound is generally appealing simple. A hip hop style drum machine beat adds a bit of edge. On Complicated, Lavigne vents her frustration at a guy who's good and relaxed when they're alone but becomes foolish and showy around others.

  19. Dave Matthews Band-Grace Is Gone    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Grace Is Gone is the second chart hit from the Busted Stuff CD. Grace Is Gone is one of a number of songs the Dave Mattthews Band recorded in sessions with producer Steve Lillywhite, scrapped when the band decided to start again with new songs for the Everyday CD and rerecorded for Busted Stuff. Grace Is Gone is fairly typical DMB music. It has mellow, likable music and its well played. On Grace Is Gone, Matthews drinks to deal with the departure of the woman who broke my heart. While he sings I could never love again so much as I love you, Matthews claims that after one more drink, hell be ready to move on.

  20. Nickelback-Never Again    (down 12 positions)      buy it!
    Chad Kroeger's dreary chart dominance continues. Never Again, the third single from Nickelback's Silver Side Up CD, debuted on the top 50 while Kroeger's awful Hero was still #1. Never Again is one of Silver Side Up's harder rocking songs but, even with the big guitars, it suffers from the same deadly seriousness and lack of originality as Kroeger's previous hits. Never Again is another song that seems related to Kroeger's troubled youth. Like Too Bad, Never Again is about a dysfunctional home. This time instead of being absent, the dad is a physically abusive drunk. Kroeger is a kid afraid his mom is going to get killed. The happy ending has the mom grabbing a gun and pulling "the trigger just as fast as she can." As always, I don't question Kroeger's sincerity or right to express his pain but wish he could express himself in a more interesting, fresh way.

  21. Eve featuring Alicia Keys-Gangsta Lovin'    (down 5 positions)      buy it!
    Eve's new CD is called Eve-Olution. Gangsta Lovin' has the same kind of easy, likably playful sound as Eve's first big pop hit Let Me Blow Ya Mind. Ja Rule/Ashanti producer Irv Gotti gave Gangsta Lovin' a good sound with a steady, relaxed beat and a catchy synth riff. Eve's rap is appealingly confident and straight forward. She's strong and subtly teasing as she tells a guy she's interested. Alicia Keys' vocal on the chorus is assisted by backing singers and hardly challenging but her smooth, laid back singing fits Gangsta Lovin's charming, breezy mood.

  22. Sum 41-Still Waiting    new to music chart      buy it!
    Sum 41's new CD is called Does This Look Infected? Sum 41 broke through with the youthful, poppy, punky hits from All Killer, No Filler CD. Still Waiting shows signs that the band is making the huge mistake of wanting to grow up and be taken seriously. Still Waiting's video reveals jealousy at the critical respect The Strokes receive. On Fat Lip, the band just demanded the chance to have a good, stupid time. Now they want us to believe that they're looking for "hope to believe" in a world full of hating. It seems clear that Sum 41 is best suited to make dopey, fun music and that's what people want from them. Still Waiting, with its attempt at lyrical significance and Derick Whibley's meaningful ranting, has an uncomfortable resemblance to the lesser work of The Offspring, whose music seems to get stupider the more they try to seem smart. Still Waiting does show benefits of Sum 41's new intensity. I don't love the darkness of the singing and Whibley and Dave Baksh's guitar but I do like that Still Waiting is fast, energetic and focused, without the foolishness that has made some of their music more cutesy than fun.

  23. SR-71-Tomorrow    new to music chart      buy it!
    Tomorrow, the title track from SR-71's new CD, seems to confirm that the Baltimore band has no distinctive personality and merely follows trends that sell records. When Blink 182 were red hot, SR-71 was playing similar punky pop. They had a hit with Right Now, a song that was even more obnoxious and unoriginal than the other fast juvenile music of a couple years ago. Hybrid Theory was the biggest selling record of 2001 and, what do you know, SR-71 are back on the charts with a song with Linkin Park's dark, threatening sound. Tomorrow is a faint copy of Linkin Park's In The End without the flavor Mike Shinoda's rap gave that song. Mitch Allan, like Chester Bennington, sings about being in turmoil but he doesn't have Bennington's intensity. Allan does a decent job of evoking paranoia but he seems like he's ripping off Linkin Park, Korn and so many others. Similarly, the music, with its forbidding atmosphere of booming and droning guitars, feels second hand. Allan sings about an unspecified "they" who "find a way to make you feel discarded", feel "you've become a complication" and are "all waiting for the crash". He does admit that it's "myself" who makes him feel caged.

  24. Tracy Chapman-You're The One    new to music chart      buy it!
    On her self titled 1988 debut CD, Tracy Chapman was a striking new talent making music that was political and personal. She seemed to have the potential to move folk music in exciting new directions. Chapman has since made pleasant, thoughtful music but the deeper she gets into career, the more her work leaves the impression of unfulfilled potential. You're The One, from the Let It Rain CD, has a sweet Chapman vocal and a nice, positive feel but it's so lightweight and unambitious it's barely noticable. I assume Chapman is trying to pare her music to its essentials but she's also pared away what can be interesting about her writing and music. You're The One's lyric is charming. Chapman promises to stand by a lover who others say is crazy, uncouth and no good.

  25. Coldplay-In My Place    (down 5 positions)      buy it!
    Coldplay's second CD is called A Rush Of Blood To The Head. In My Place lacks Yellow's rock guitar drive but it otherwise resembles Coldplay's biggest hit. It has the likable, dreamy feel that marked Yellow, Trouble and much of the Parachutes CD. Chris Martin's vocal is, as usual, appealingly modest and sensitive. Jon Buckland's trademark ethereal guitar tone accentuates the music's delicate weightlessness. In My Place again takes Coldplay close to background music but In My Place has enough texture and beauty to give it real charm. On In My Place, Martin sings that he was lost and "underprepared" and he's now willing to wait for the object of his affection who's still waiting for another.

Songs 1-25


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