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All-Reviews.com Top 50 Songs*:
for the 3rd week of July, 2003

*based on airplay at alternative, pop and rock radio stations a cross the nation (reviews by LarryG)

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  1. Evanesence-Bring Me To Life    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Evanescence is a Little Rock, Arkansas band started by former camp buddies Amy Lee and Ben Moody. Bring Me To Life is on the Daredevil soundtrack and Evanescence's Fallen CD. It was inevitable that someone would take the pop metal sound that's dominated rock music the last couple years and make it more glossy and even poppier. Bring Me To Life strikes me as one of the silliest hits of recent times. It brings to mind a bizarre mix of Linkin Park and the bloated Meat Loaf influenced hits Bonnie Tyler had in the early 80s. Bring Me To Life is also a touch gothic. Singer Amy Lee comes on like a spacier Sarah McLachlan though, to McLachlan's credit, she's never been as overdramatic as Lee is. With sweeping strings, crunching guitars, vaguely ominous synths and guest vocalist Paul McCoy playing Mike Shinoda(Linkin Park's rapper), Bring Me To Life throws in everything but the kitchen sink to make a hit. I can imagine how Bring Me To Life's over the top style could work on the soundtrack of a movie about a superhero but out of that context, it's ridiculously overblown. Bring Me To Life is fairly bad poetry. Lee appreciates how a guy can "see into my eyes like open doors leading you into my core" and asks him to wake her numb, soulless, sleeping spirit and "save me from the nothing I've become."

  2. Trapt-Headstrong    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Headstrong is from the California band's self titled major label debut. Headstrong holds some hints that Trapt could be more interesting than other nu-metal bands. The sound isn't as cluttered or murky as that of some of their contemporaries. The verses are pretty good. Chris Brown's vocal is smooth and quick with a rapper's sensibility. The vocal is nicely underlined by Simon Ormandy's light, loose guitar. The chorus is effective but less interesting as Brown and Ormandy's trade short, jagged thrusts of guitar. Brown's angry croon is awfully familiar. In the end, not much distinguishes Headstrong from intense rap metal by Linkin Park, Papa Roach and many others. Headstrong is competently made but not particularly likable or interesting. Headstrong apparently announces a break with an ambitious musical associate who won't change his wrong ideas.

  3. Audioslave-Like A Stone    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Audioslave follow Cochise, the very enjoyably over the top, heavily Led Zeppellin influenced headbanger with a good, very subdued song. Who would have thought that the union of members of two hard rocking 90s bands would create a mellow, restrained hit? Rage Against The Machine weren't known for rock ballads but their musicans sound surprisingly comfortable playing a radio friendly midtempo rocker. Chris Cornell previously eschewed his usual Robert Plant inspired shriek on Soundgarden songs like Fell On Black Days and his solo record so his participation is some what less surprising, but his smooth vocal on Like A Stone is still notable. Like A Stone sounds like various mainstream rockers but it still has power. Like A Stone's sprawling pace and Cornell's controlled, strong singing give Like A Stone an epic, spell binding appeal. Guitarist Tom Morello does a good job providing a low key, textured background with a slight sense of menace. He also gets to shine with a solo that's not as hard as his Rage playing but shows a good sense of flair and drama, as his processed guitar twists around the notes. Like A Stone's lyric is a tale of devotion. Cornell sings about being obsessed by a long ago relationship. He apparently takes solace in the hope that if we're good, we'll lay to rest anywhere we want to go, so he'll eventually be reunited "in your house." Like A Stone is a bit formulaic and sappy but it's also quite gripping.

  4. Chevelle-Send The Pain Below    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Send The Pain Below is the second chart hit from the Wonder What's Next CD by the band comprised of three born again Christian brothers from Chicago. The Red was a bit monotonous but it had a good, insinuating guitar riff and had a long run on rock radio. Send The Pain Below is less distinctive. It has the Creed feeling of being a pastiche of Pearl Jam and other grunge bands. At least singer Pete Loeffler doesn't come across pretentiously like Creed's Scott Stapp. He's thoughtful in an unshowy way as he sings about his ability to suppress his emotional pain. His low key guitar playing is appropriate to the lyrics' stark emotion. At times, the match of restrained but intense singing and basic, booming sustained chords remind me of Radiohead's Creep. But generally, Send The Pain Below doesn't have Creep's depth. It's so downbeat that it's hard to distinguish from the other songs where young men share their hurt. The similarity to other songs is accentuated towards the end when Loeffler goes into a Korn/Trust Company style rant("I can't feel my chest,drop down"). Send The Pain Below's message is oddly common in similar songs: you hurt me when you manipulated when we were together and I miss you. Send The Pain Below has an intensity that can be compelling but it's ultimately too indistinctive and humorless to keep my interest.

  5. Jane's Addiction-Just Because    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Perry Farrell has returned to two of his most successful projects. Lollapalooza, the concert tour that Ferrell co-founded, is back for the first time in six years. In time for that Jane's Addiction, with original members Farrell, Dave Navarro and drummer Stephen Perkins, have released Strays, their first record of all new songs since 1990's Ritual de lo Habitual. Jane's Addiction were quite huge but Farrell's intervening work, with Porno For Pyros and on a solo record, was often obscure. Jane's Addiction are smart to reintroduce themselves with a song that gets your attention and announces that they still matter. Farrell and Navarro are also aware that alternative rock music got harder while Jane's Addiction was away. Navarro, who was a Red Hot Chili Pepper and put out a solo record during Jane's break, drives Just Because forward with an attacking, ringing guitar line that sounds a lot like The Edge's on Pride(In The Name Of Love). Farrell tones down his vocal mannerisms. He still has distinctive phrasing, stretching out certain words but his personality doesn't overshadow the song as he does battle with Navarro's slashing. Just Because lacks the eccentricities that originally set the band apart from other groups but it's fun and it rocks. Just Because's lyric is apparently a warning that a relationship might be over because Farrell's partner never does things just because she feels like it.

  6. Matchbox 20-Unwell    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Unwell is the second single from the More Than You Think You Are CD. It's an improvement over Disease, a lame attempt at a rocker and pale imitation of Smooth, Rob Thomas' Santana collaboration. Unwell has the soothing, easy, well crafted sound that helped make the band big. The chorus is catchy and hard to resist. But generally, Unwell is bland. It's so tastefully innocuous that it barely registers. A banjo in the beginning and end adds a little flavor but Unwell could use a lot more. It doesn't help that Unwell, like Disease, is another tale of how screwed up Thomas is. Especially now that Matchbox 20 is an established, very successful band, Thomas' repeated tales of woe are increasingly tiresome. Unwell is more optimistic than some of them. Thomas thinks "I'm headed for a breakdown and I don't know why" but he also feels like he'll soon get things together.

  7. Staind-So Far Away    (up 2 positions)      buy it!
    I kind of liked Price To Pay, the first single from Staind's 14 Shades Of Grey CD. It wasn't great but it was a decent rocker with more energy than the draggy, self pitying hits from the Break The Cycle CD. Price To Pay didn't last on the charts so the second single is a return to the oppressively empty, self important sound that's worked before. The good news is that, in contrast to Break The Cycle's tales of pain emanating from an abused past, So Far Away's lyric is cautiously upbeat. The bad news is that the music doesn't reflect Aaron Lewis' new optimism. So, as before, Lewis slowly rolls through the lyric, enunciating so we can fully experience his emotion. I still don't get why rock fans are interested in this overblown junk. It's lame and predictable. So Far Away has the standard pattern of verses with a quiet acoustic guitar leading into a bombastic chorus with big power guitars chords and slowly, seriously pounded drums meant to connote meaning. Things get even gloppier as strings underline Lewis' vocal when he gets really intense. Maybe the music is supposed to communicate Lewis' concern that he "must be sleeping." Lewis' voice remains dour and lugubrious and the pace is consistently glacial even as Lewis sings about moving away from struggle, not being ashamed of who he is and being able to smile and face the day.

  8. Train-Calling All Angels    (unchanged)      buy it!
    When they first broke through, Train at least presented themselves as a rock band. As Train's career has progressed, it's become clear that their music is made for easy listening radio. Drops Of Jupiter showed Train's gift for making music appropriate for elevators, dentist offices and yuppie background music. With its slathering of strings, Drops Of Jupiter was smooth and soothing but also sickly sweet. My first impression of Calling All Angels, the first single from the My Private Nation CD, was that it was more fairly empty lite rock. But further listens have shown that the sound has impressive depth. Calling All Angels is similar to Something More, from the Drops Of Jupiter CD. Something More clearly resembled psychedelic late period Beatles. Calling All Angels also has a layered, carefully constructed sound that is even more rich and rewarding. Unlike Something More, where the band didn't seem to know where to go after introducing their musical ideas, Calling All Angels continues to grow in power as it moves towards its conclusion Brendan O'Brien, who has produced dozens of good rock records by artists including Pearl Jam, Bruce Springsteen and Matthew Sweet, played on and produced Calling All Angels. I like the patient pace, Scott Underwood's big beat and the piano that fills out the striking soundcape. Calling All Angels reaches a majestic conclusion with a blanket of joyful voices. Calling All Angels isn't perfect. Pat Monahan's vocal generally matches the song's hopeful, optimistic tone but he can also sound like a mediocre mannered rock singer, especially when repeatedly invoking the "I won't give up if you don't give up" hook. The lyric's attempts at social commentary like "my tv set just keeps it all from being clear" and "football teams are kissing queens and losing sight of having dreams" are pretty lame. The whole idea of calling for a sign of angelic presence in troubled times is pretty sappy. But the positive, yearning music goes beyond the lyric in creating an appealing feeling.

  9. Linkin Park-Faint    (up 3 positions)      buy it!
    Faint, the second chart hit from Linkin Park's Meteora CD, is easily my favorite Linkin Park single so far. It gets off to a great start with a very good, distinctive riff and a sped up beat. Things take a bit of a turn for the worse when Mike Shinoda begins his flat, dull rap but at least he moves fast and doesn't slow Faint's momentum too much. Chester Bennington's raging howl is typically over the top(does a guy whose record sold more than 8 million copies have any right to scream, "I won't be ignored"?) Even if Bennington's anger is goofy, he gives the song power and fits well into Faint's supercharged atmosphere. Faint's chorus, which takes the song's fast, slippery beat and adds Bennington's wail and a wall of guitars, maintains the song's energy and has a catchy hook. Faint depicts an internal struggle about an unresponsive girlfriend. Shinoda plays the wimpy ego, whining about being lonely and unconfident, complaining about his emotional scars and pleading "'cause you're all I got." Bennington is the unrestrained, pissed off id demanding "you're gonna listen to me."

  10. Cold-Stupid Girl    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Jacksonvilles Cold have always seemed like just another hard rocking band with a serious, intense singer and an unoriginal, hard rocking sound. Stupid Girl, from the Year Of The Spider CD, doesnt do much to change that impression. Scooter Ward does a tough guy vocal, ranting out his ambivalence(wanna love ya, wanna bug ya) about a girl whos leaving him. The surprise fact is that Weezers Rivers Cuomo co-wrote and played guitar on Stupid Girl. Its unclear whether Ward or Cuomo, whos often written about being unlucky in love, contributed the self pity(Im a loner, Im a loser) but its a safe bet that Cuomo had a lot to do with Stupid Girls catchy chorus. The chorus simplifies the lyrics to shes going away, whats wrong with my life today. The sound is seductively smoothed out with an appealing wash of power chords. Unfortunately, Stupid Girl keeps returning to verses with standard hard rock theatrics and Wards silly barking and draggy enunciation. Stupid Girl is half fun, dopey arena classic and half, lame routine modern rocker.

  11. Foo Fighters-Times Like These    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Dave Grohl has become an elder statesman of modern rock. 2003 started with songs he played on by Foo Fighters, Nirvana and Queens Of The Stone Age in the top 10 and the hits keep coming. Times Like These is the second top 50 hit from Foo Fighters' One By One CD. Times Like These isn't quite as good as All My Life but it has a superficial charm and is one of the better songs on a fairly bad CD. It's got the unremarkable competence that marks so much Foo Fighters music. The most striking thing about Times Like These is its guitar riff, copped from The Cult's She Sells Sanctuary, which gives the song some excitement(and, along with the lyrical allusion to Husker Du's New Day Rising, a 1985 vibe). Otherwise, Times Like These is innocuous but fine. Grohl's voice seems even less skilled than usual. It's hard to argue with the lyrics' message that, even in a screwed up world, you have to live and love. But it ain't exactly deep and reminds me of the lame post September 11 claims that the terrorists win if we don't do things(go shopping, take that flight, go ahead with the Emmys).

  12. Linkin Park-Somewhere I Belong    (down 5 positions)      buy it!
    Linkin Park's new Meteora CD comes two and a half years after the release of Linkin Park's 8 million selling Hybrid Theory CD. Somewhere I Belong indicates that the band didn't use the time to develop new dimensions to their music and instead have done safe retreads of their hugely successful work. Somewhere I Belong showcases the vocal styles that established Linkin Park's identity but doesn't do much with them. Mike Shinoda's rap is particularly drab, stiff and uninteresting. Chester Bennington has more presence, working his trademark shriek but while he's intense, he's stuck in the same tone, never really going nuts like he has before. His lack of modulation makes his rage seem like meaningless griping. Somewhere I Belong doesn't grab your attention like Linkin Park's previous hits did. Shinoda is almost amateurishly wan while Bennington's parts are repetitive and don't go anywhere. The band again worked with producer Don Gilmore. The chorus is catchy with Brad Delson's guitar crunching into a hard but sleek wall of sound. But Somewhere I Belong lacks personality. The insistent blend of hard rock interjections and glossy pop brings to mind Nickelback's terrible hit How You Remind Me. The good news about Somewhere I Belong is that instead of just griping about emotional pain, the lyrics take responsibity and refer to wanting to heal. But maybe that calmer attitude explains Somewhere I Belong's lack of intensity.

  13. Audioslave-Show Me How To Live    (up 2 positions)      buy it!
    The hits from Audioslave's self titled debut CD show that the former Rage Against The Machine musicians are surprisingly adept at the sort of classic rock influenced rock radio friendly songs singer Chris Cornell made with Soundgarden. Cochise was a big, fun Led Zeppellin pastiche and Like A Stone was an effectively dramatic, sprawling rock ballad. Show Me How To Live is another trip into Led Zeppellin territory. It doesn't have the over the top thrill of headbanger Cochise but it still works pretty well. The distinctiveness(and political edge) of Rage Against The Machine's music is largely missing on the Audioslave CD. Show Me How To Live is fairly generic, if effective, hard rock that sounds like a Soundgarden song. Tom Morello's tough, grinding guitar line and Brad Wilk's big basic beat give Show Me How To Live a good, gritty rock and roll edge. Chris Cornell always sounds pretty much the same and he's, typically, a little overdramatic. But the other side of his overblown vocal is that he provides a rousing, theatrical feeling that separates him from his intense, serious competition. Show Me How To Live is an unremarkable, solid hard rocker. Dealing with the "ringing in my head", Cornell demands to "my creator, you gave me life now show me how to live."

  14. The Ataris-The Boys Of Summer    (up 6 positions)      buy it!
    The Ataris are back on the chart with another piece of nostalgia from their So Long, Astoria CD. They follow In This Diary, Kris Roe's misty eyed recollection of a fun summer of his youth with a cover of Don Henley's longing look back at an ideal romantic period. The Ataris do a predictable but solid version, playing it harder and faster and reminding us that the original was pretty good. I bet cover bands did a similar version when Boys Of Summer was first a hit. Roe's innocent, youthful(he was 6 years old when Boys Of Summer came out in 1984) voice matches the song's hopeful tone as he vows to "get you back." The Ataris keep the original's arrangement including Mike Campbell's great, memorable guitar part and the haunting/kind of goofy atmospheric sound effects. The Ataris don't show much originality but they have good energy and force.

  15. Kelly Clarkson-Miss Independent    (up 2 positions)      buy it!
    Miss Independent, the first single from the Thankful CD, is a good move for the American Idol '02 winner. Clarkson could probably get a few more hits sticking with the big, emotive ballads that are so popular with American Idol's audience. But Clarkson undoubtedly realizes if she wants a long career, she'll need to connect with the majority of Americans who aren't fans of the easy listening American Idol sound. So, like balladeers including Whitney and Celine, Clarkson is sure to alternate dance pop with her slow, dramatic songs. Miss Independent indicates that Clarkson has taken Christina Aguilera as a role model for her dance pop. Clarkson was pushed in that direction by producer Rhett Lawrence. Lawrence wrote Miss Independent with Aguilera. When it didn't make Aguilera's Stripped CD, Lawrence brought it to Clarkson who supposedly, with Lawrence, reworked it. Miss Independent still sounds just like a Christina Aguilera song(it's odd to hear it back to back with Aguilera's Fighter) and not a great one. Still, in my mind, anything is an improvement over big, showy, empty, generic ballads like Clarkson's first hit: A Moment Like This. Miss Independent is better than Fighter, simply because it doesn't overdo things. The backing is relatively restrained and functional. The verses get good edge from a steady riff with the sound of a tight electric guitar strum and a crisp angular beat. The chorus, with chords crunching in under Clarkson's singing, is very familiar but it is effectively dramatic, Clarkson's vocal doesn't show much distinctive personality but it stays strong, twisting around and not getting overwhelmed by the song's electronics. Miss Independent's lyric doesn't really match Clarkson sweet, regular gal image. It reads more like an attempt, like Beautiful, to redefine Aguilera's unlikable persona. Miss Independent is about a woman who, after working hard at projecting a harsh aura of self sufficiency, drops her defenses and falls hopelessly in love.

  16. White Stripes-Seven Nation Army    (unchanged)      buy it!
    White Stripes have followed the surprise million selling White Blood Cells CD with the even more successful Elephant. Seven Nation Army is their biggest radio hit so far. Like White Blood Cells, Elephant is a very good record that throws all sorts of ideas together. Singer/songwriter Jack White alternates(sometimes in the same song) between sincere and cynical and between goofy pop and serious, intense power chord laden hard rock. White's songs are unified by a seemingly natural weirdness and a good sense of a hook. White Stripes are still just guitar player Jack and drummer Meg White but Jack varies the sound and keeps it interesting. Unlike most of White Stripes' music, Seven Nation Army has a bass line(apparently played on a processed guitar). The verses, with Meg banging and Jack playing the big, basic bass line, give Jack space for his odd, strangely compelling vocal. Instead of shifting to a chorus, Seven Nation Army adds an electric guitar that basically tracks the bass line but creates a squealing intensity as the song dissolves into a fun jam before returning to another verse. Seven Nation Army is great, partly because its recurring riff is so good and memorable. Seven Nation Army has the kind of weird lyric that adds to White Stripes' charm. Sounding crazy and paranoid but also like he might have a point, Jack alternately promises to fight and ignore an unnamed enemy. He finally decides to avoid the struggle, go to Wichita and "work the straw." On Seven Nation Army, White Stripes music is again unpolished, odd and powerful.

  17. Black Eyed Peas-Where Is The Love?    (up 2 positions)      buy it!
    Black Eyed Peas are a LA based group, led by Will.I.Am, who have made music that combines various forms of hip hop and rock and usually has a positive message. Black Eyed have flirted with success before. Request Line(featuring Macy Gray), from the Bridging The Gap CD, was a minor hit as was Long Beach All Stars' Sunny hours, which had a rap by Will.I.Am. Black Eyed Peas have broken through in a big way with a smash hit that brings to mind classic R&B reflections on the state of the world by Marvin Gaye and Stevie Wonder as well as more recent ones by Arrested Development, Outkast and Fugees. Where Is The Love, from the Elephunk CD, has a good, light touch. Justin Timberlake helps out, doing a good job singing the chorus in a sweet falsetto. Strings give Where Is The Love a majestic, hopeful feel. The verses are helped by a simple skipping riff under the raps. Black Eyed Peas' three rappers each take a verse. They all have distinctive voices and, even while bemoaning various problems, they don't contradict the theme that the situation can be helped with love. The first verse urges people not to just focus on terrorism but to work on the hatreds that exist within our country. The second verse starts with the fairly standard idea that love is better than dropping bombs then refers to a war going on for a secret reason. The third verse attacks a world where "most of us only care about money makin'" and "wrong information is always shown by the media." Regardless of the specifics of the words, Where Is The Love's easy flow and upbeat vibe make it one of the summer's best singles.

  18. Beyonce' featuring Jay-Z-Crazy In Love    (up 3 positions)      buy it!
    I've never been a big Beyonce Knowles fan. She always seemed competent but coldly ambitious as she solidified her success and control of Destiny's Child. I doubt that she's become a different person but on Crazy In Love, from her solo debut Dangerously In Love CD, Knowles is more likable than usual. Knowles produced Crazy In Love with Rich Harrison, who's also worked with Mary J. Blige and Kelly Rowland. There isn't much new to their sounds but they use them to create a very fun result. Crazy In Love is very effectively constructed. It has an irresistable momentum, never taking a break as it keeps the good time sounds coming. The verses get a great jittery energy from a fast cymbal driven sound. Beyonce's vocal effectively slides quickly around the beat. The chorus takes the excitement a notch higher with a horn sample from the Chi-lites' Are You My Woman?(Tell Me So) which, along with a pounding beat, maintains the song's buoyant spirit as Beyonce repeats her joyful proclamation that she's crazy for the guy who's doing love no one else can. The rap by Beyonce's apparent boyfriend Jay-Z sounds like it was spliced into the song afterwards but Jay-Z's confident, fast moving, good natured boasts fit easily into one of the most enjoyable singles of the summer.

  19. Metallica-St. Anger    (down 5 positions)      buy it!
    St. Anger is Metallica's first record of all new material since the Load and Reload records of '96 and '97. St. Anger's title track is a bit of a mixed bag. Metallica distinguish themselves with a confident, free flowing sound that puts to shame the cautious, imitative rockers Metallica have influenced. I like St. Anger's fast parts. Lars Ulrich's ridiculously fast drums, aided by Kirk Hammett and James Hetfield's big, stomping guitars, whip up a great frenzy of energy. I often find James Hetfield's incredibly intense wail overwrought and a little silly. In my mind, the problem is compounded on St. Anger by Hetfield's account of inner pain. Hetfield sings about having anger "round my neck", wanting "my anger to be healthy" and wanting to "set my anger free." Hetfield's turmoil is undeniably real but, since so many lesser bands have exploited their struggle to control their rage, the self centered lyrics make Metallica less interesting than they've been in the past. The rapped interjections of "it's rushing out" help maintain St. Anger's striking momentum but they also invite comparisons to the rap metal bands who borrowed from Metallica in creating cynically commercial music. Still, St. Anger is one of the best rock songs of recent times. St. Anger gets great rock force from guys singing and playing hard and fast. St. Anger is also admirably ambitious. Its distinct, everchanging segments stir up a fun, anarchic spirit.

  20. Michelle Branch-Are You Happy Now?    (up 11 positions)      buy it!
    For her new Hotel Paper CD, Michelle Branch stuck with John Shanks, who's worked with Sheryl Crow, Stevie Nicks and Melissa Etheridge and produced Branch's The Spirit Room CD. The result on Are You Happy Now is radio friendly but not very exciting. Alanis Morissette's influence on Branch is quite apparent. The similarity is especially there on Are You Happy Now, which is basically You Oughta Know light. The 21 year old Morissette was fascinating, raging furiously against a betraying boyfriend. The 20 year old Branch merely sounds whiny and self pitying. The other appropriate comparison is to Avril Lavigne. Branch has played the weepy, sensitive second banana to Lavigne's confident, in your face punk rock fan. Are You Happy Now, written by Branch and Shanks, shows awareness of the competition. Branch's screaming on the chorus and the simple, rock guitar driven dramatic music brings Lavigne to mind. Are You Happy Now has some of the thrill that dynamic shifts from quiet to boisterous bring but it doesn't have the energy of Lavigne's best songs. The verses drag by with an uninteresting drum machine beat and vague synth embellishments. Are You Happy Now's lyric perpetuates Branch's persona as the girl who doesn't quite fit in and is doomed to wallow in disappointment. Are You Happy Now is about looking for satisfaction in the fact that the guy who left her isn't happy either. The good news for Branch is that at least as many young women in Branch's target preteen and early teen audience relate to Branch's awkward misfit as to Lavigne's cocky popular girl. Branch's voice is annoyingly girlish and thin but enough girls relate to Branch's insecurities and her very youthful voice to make Are You Happy Now a big hit.

  21. Queens Of The Stone Age-Go With The Flow    (up 6 positions)      buy it!
    Queens Of The Stone Age's Songs For The Deaf is a good, ambitious hard rocking record that works best when the guys loosen up a little. Go With The Flow, the followup to longtime top 50 resident No One Knows, gets a fun, frantic energy from Dave Grohl's hard, distinctively whacking and Nick Oliveri's sturdy, fast bass line. Simple, steady piano and Josh Homme's cutting guitar interjections also help hurtle the song forward. In the midst of Go With The Flow's ebullient chaos, Homme's controlled, unshowy vocal provides some balance. Homme's singing is a welcome contrast to the emotive narcissism that dominates rock music these days. Go With The Flow is apparently about being willing to go along with a breakup but not being happy about.

  22. Busta Rhymes featuring Mariah Carey-I Know What You Want    (unchanged)      buy it!
    I Know What You Want is on Busta Rhymes' It Ain't Safe No More CD. I Know What You Want is not particularly distinctive. It's another smooth R&B song with a star cameo and a bunch of singers doing a verse a piece. But I Know What You Want is well made and appealingly smooth. Members of Flipmode Squad, who have appeared on Rhymes' records for years, don't do much with their verses and get too hung up in the end on dropping names of expensive products. Mariah Carey's whispery contributions to the chorus and a cliched bit of showing off on her "I will climb a mountain high" verse are kind of silly. I Know What You Want's surprise is Rhymes' sweet, controlled vocal. I've always thought of Rhymes(born Trevor Smith) as an over the top, in your face, kind of obnoxious performer. His singing on the catchy chorus and his verse(the one that starts ssh, mommy listen) isn't remarkable but it is likably unassuming and matches the lyric about understanding the woman who's stood by him and wanting to do what he can for her. I Know What You Want's music is innocuous but pleasant with a repeated strum effect and synth beeping that are restrained enough that they aren't too annoying. I Know What You Want passes by easily and with some charm.

  23. Jewel-Intuition    (up 14 positions)      buy it!
    Jewel's image, as the sincere folkie who writes poetry and wants people to take her overripe writing seriously, was getting drab. She has come up with a smart surprise by simplifying and lightening up on her new CD. Jewel worked on the 0304 CD with Lester Mendez, who produced and played keyboards on records by Latin pop artists like Shakira and Enrique and Julio Iglesias. Intuition is like lots of other dance pop songs but it still works. Intuition is repetitive and insubstantial but it has a light, easy mood. Mendez maintains a solid beat that doesn't overwhelm Jewel's voice. Jewel, singing with a sensual roll in her voice, sounds like she's having fun mixing up vocal styles. Part of Intuition's success must be attributable to its video. Jewel has projected a seductive image before, on the record and video for You Were Meant For Me. On Intuition she has it both ways, satirizing the way advertisers use sex to attract people to their products while undoubtedly attracting people to Intuition with her alluring poses and clothes. I assume Jewel has a similar intent on the record, gently mocking the mechanical nature of many hits and overdoing the provocative swoon in her voice while knowing those qualities are likely to get her a hit. Intuition's lyric mocks a world obsessed with "Miss J's big butt" where people "learn cool from magazines" and "learn love from Charlie Sheen." Jewel's unstartling advice is to "follow your heart." Jewel's intuition led her to make radio friendly dance pop. Intuition has a lot of internal contradictions but it is pleasant, slight, disposable pop.

  24. Sean Paul-Get Busy    (down 1 position)      buy it!
    Sean Paul Henriquez has moved from having dancehall hits in his native Jamaica to international stardom. Get Busy is from Sean Pauls Dutty Rock CD. Pauls loose, goofy rap has its charm. His admonitions for the ladies to shake their booties and get it on with him are harmless. His easy confidence and lack of self consciousness roll over your resistance. But Pauls cocky, lady loving Jamaican is such a stereotype that Get Busy is largely a novelty song. Get Busys saving grace is its infectious music. Get Busy was produced by dancehall veteran Steven Lenky Marsden, who suddenly has two big pop hits. As he did on Wayne Wonders No Letting Go, Marsden used a dawali rhythm on Get Busy. The diwali rhythm, produced by irregular handclaps accompanied by quietly ringing synths, creates a joyful noise and supplies a lot of Get Busys charm. Paul contributes by moving fast and keeping up with the buoyant spirit. Pauls lyric is dopey and innocuous but the musics energy makes Get Busy breezy fun.

  25. Uncle Kracker featuring Dobie Gray-Drift Away    (up 7 positions)      buy it!
    Considering that his main goal seems to be making genial, innoucuous pop, Uncle Kracker(born Matt Shafer) has had a decent career. But he hadn't really been able to follow up on Follow Me from his debut CD. In A Little While, which had Uncle Kracker's typical mellow, modest style, was a minor hit. It took a cover of an extremely familiar song to give Uncle Kracker a big hit from his No Strange To Shame CD, which came out last summer. The new version of Drift Away is a remake in the strictest sense. It's a nearly exact copy of Dobie Gray's 1973 hit. It's pleasant but totally unnecessary. The nice thing about Drift Away 2003, I guess, is that it gives Gray another chance in the spotlight. Now in his 60s, Gray still sounds good. Gray's strong, full voice easily outdoes Uncle Kracker's thin, indistinct singing. Drift Away isn't the most remarkable of pop classics. It's a soothing song about how music can provide calm in a troubling life. Drift Away's chief attribute is that it's appealing smooth and relaxed. Uncle Kracker leaves in place the easy, pleasing keyboards and guitars that made Drift Away a lite hits radio staple. But he doesn't add anything that makes the song better or more interesting than the original. I guess one other benefit of the new version is that it settles a question I've had since I was a kid. Yes he says "beat boys" not Beach Boys.

Songs 26-50


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