All reviews all the time! Home   Movies   Music   Video Games


 Search Amazon
  
 Browse CDs 

 Browse Songs 

 Amazon Music Lists 

 Other

 

10000031

 

 

All-Reviews.com Top 50 Songs*:
for the 2nd week of December, 2001

*based on airplay at alternative, pop and rock radio stations a cross the nation (reviews by LarryG)

music cd song reviews Change Week music cd song reviews
Current Week  |  Main Song Chart Page

  1. Nickelback-How You Remind Me    (unchanged)      buy it!
    How You Remind Me, from Nickelback's Silver Side Up CD, is practically a Nirvana sampler. You can play name that tune as it resembles Come As You Are, Lithium and countless other songs. Chad Kroeger is ever so serious and humorless as he sings about being "sick inside without a sense of feeling" after a breakup. Still, How You Remind Me works because it makes good use of familiar tools. Like Nirvana, Nickelback use the thrill of rock dynamics, shifting from quiet verses to choruses with sweeping power chords. How You Remind Me has a big, tight sound. The lyrics have the self pity of a lot of recent rock but avoid the nastiness and excess of many of Nickelback's contemporaries.

  2. Creed-My Sacrifice    (up 1 position)      buy it!
    My Sacrifice, the first single from Creed's new Weathered CD, sounds a lot like the singles from their last CD Human Clay. Creed and their frontman Scott Stapp apparently can't help but make big, lofty sincere rock music. I find My Sacrifice empty and pretentious but don't hate it as much as most of Creed's music. My Sacrifice closely resembles Higher and With Arms Wide Open but it's not quite as self indulgent as those songs. It also rocks a little harder than those songs. Like What If, My Sacrifice has big power chords and sounds like standard hard rock but Stapp's vocal isn't unpleasantly angry like it was on What If. Stapp's lyrics typically embrace lofty images("above all the others we'll fly, this brings tears to my eyes") but don't make his usual attempt at spiritual meaning. They're actually kind of nice. Stapp sings about gladly forgetting old grudges to restart a friendship that's seen its ups and downs.

  3. Lenny Kravitz-Dig In    (down 1 position)      buy it!
    I've long disliked Kravitz' self satisfied, unimaginative classic rock ripoffs but I have to admit that Dig In, while still clearly showing the influence of Sly & The Family Stone and others, has an easy energy and is a lot of fun. Dig In's big beat and loose, echoey sound reminds me of ELO's homage to psychedelic era Beatles, Don't Bring Me Down. Dig In, from the Lenny CD, has a familiar message, urging us to experience life and enjoy ourselves, but its relaxed high spirits and tight, propulsive guitar line are even better at telling us to have a good time.

  4. Staind-It's Been Awhile    (unchanged)      buy it!
    It's Been Awhile, the first single from the Break The Cycle CD, entered the top 50 as singer Aaron Lewis had just made the top 10 for the first time with Outside from the Family Values Tour CD. It's Been Awhile is similar to Outside: thoughtful and fairly subtle for radio rock but very serious and not much fun. It's Been Awhile is another song about Lewis' troubled mind. He sings about how he always screws things and longs for the feeling of relief that came with his love. It's Been Awhile's verses are fairly quiet and similar to Outside. Power chords and drums create rock drama on the chorus but things don't get too overdone.

  5. Linkin Park-In The End    (up 1 position)      buy it!
    Linkin Park's first two singles from the Hybrid Theory CD   communicated youthful turmoil with raging hard rock and Chester Bennington's loud, nasty yell. In The End is less harsh and confrontational as the band move into Limp Bizkit territory. In The End is effective but very familiar, closely tracking Limp Bizkit's angry but catchy mix of rap, hard rock and vaguely sinister keyboards. Linkin Park have a slight advantage over Limp Bizkit since Mike Shinoda's rap, while fairly simplistic, isn't as stupid as Fred Durst's typical rant. Shinoda and Bennington alternate vocals, looking back bitterly at a failed relationship.

  6. Incubus-Wish You Were Here    (down 1 position)      buy it!
    Incubus follow their mellow megasuccess Drive with a song reminiscent of Make Yourself's other singles. Wish You Were Here, the first single from the Morning View CD, has Pardon Me's record scratching and Stellar's spacy atmosphere. As on Drive, the lyrics show a sincere, slightly sappy, decency. Brandon Boyd sings about being in an idyllic setting. The you he wishes were here are apparently extraterrestrials. Wish You Were Here is good sounding, if unremarkable. Big guitars beef up a basically poppy song.

  7. P.O.D.-Alive    (up 2 positions)      buy it!
    Alive, from P.O.D.'s Satellite CD, has been embraced by the MTV kids, apparently as a life affirming anthem for a time of uncertainty but Alive isn't an uplifting message to others. It's a declaration by singer Sonny Sandoval of how well he's doing. Alive's proclamation of love for God often seems silly. Sandoval claims he's taking a big chance, stating his devotion "even though it might cost me everything", as if Creed and others haven't made big bucks with catchy Christian rock. Alive's music is undeniably powerful and effective. It's big guitar hard rock with a loose hip hop sensibility. Sandoval's rock vocals has a rough rap edge. But the singing is also cold and harsh and, combined with Alive's self righteous tone, creates a hard, unappealing sound.

  8. Staind-Fade    (unchanged)      buy it!
    I look forward to seeing whether, after his huge success the past year, Aaron Lewis' future work is still about how messed up he is. Fade is another song about how Lewis' parents "were never there for me to express how I felt." Lewis enunciates every syllable to make sure you can feel his pain. Lewis isn't as nasty as other troubled rockers and he's more melodic. Lewis' vocal on Fade is fairly subtle and interesting as it rolls around the lyrics. Still, Staind's ultraserious music is standard rock, following the very common pattern of minimal verse then big guitar filled chorus. Fade has a heavy mood, with a forboding bass line.

  9. Five For Fighting-Superman    (up 1 position)      buy it!
    Superman is the second chart hit from Five For Fighting's America Town CD. It's the latest in a long series of Superman rock songs by groups from The Kinks to, more recently, Three Doors Down, Crash Test Dummies and Our Lady Peace. Like many Supermans, Five For Fighting's is an aging young man's attempt to feel better about the fact that "it's not easy to be me" with the idea that even the man of steel has problems. It's lite-fm pap. Superman should kick Five For Fighting frontman John Ondrasik's ass for putting new agey jargon like "I'm just out to find the better part of me" and "wish that I could cry" in his mouth. Superman's music is tasteful and wimpy with a quiet piano eventually joined by polite drums.

  10. Puddle Of Mudd-Blurry    (up 3 positions)      buy it!
    On Blurry, the second single from Puddle Of Mudd's Come Clean CD, Wes Scantlin follows Staind's Aaron Lewis, a fellow Fred Durst protégé, in showing his mellow side. Blurry really strikes me as lame; another rocker showing his troubled, sensitive side. Blurry's verses have a fairly interesting atmosperic guitar effect but its melody is surprisingly similar to Duncan Sheik's adult pop hit Barely Breathing. On the chorus the band, of course, has to show they can rock so the guitar sound gets bigger and Scantlin's vocal approaches the fury he showed on Control. The young males can't get enough of songs about how awful a guy feels about being mistreated by his ex. On Blurry, Scantlin seems to want her back, singing about how meaningless things are after she left him. But he also rages at her, complaining about how she could "take it all away" and shove his pain in his face.

  11. Calling-Wherever You Will Go    (up 4 positions)      buy it!
    Wherever You Will Go, from the Camino Palmero CD, got rock radio play and spent six weeks on the chart this summer. Now pop radio has returned the song to the chart. Calling join Lifehouse as the first of presumably many bands to follow Creed's model for success. Calling's Alex Band is another singer with a deep, serious, prematurely old sounding voice. Wherever You Will Go sounds a lot like Creed's With Arms Wide Open, complete with that song's sincere, overdone sound. At least it doesn't have Creed's meaningful religious overtones. Wherever You Will Go is pleasant folky rock but it's mostly bland and unimaginative. The writing is quite awful: "if I could, then I would, I'll go wherever you will go/way up high or down low." The lyrics, pining for a woman who dumped him and hoping for a way "to make it back some day", are sweet but slightly pathetic.

  12. Puddle Of Mudd-Control    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Like Staind, Puddle Of Mudd are a Fred Durst discovery. With their familiar rock sound, Puddle Of Mudd should also have quite a bit of success, but unlike Staind, who have Aaron Lewis' distinctive folky sincerity, nothing distinguishes Puddle Of Mudd from the long list of intense rockers some white male teens can't get enough of. Puddle Of Mudd aren't as abhorrent as the worst angry rockers like Linkin Park, Godsmack and Disturbed but Contol is very routine with big guitars and vocals that yell to a girl about "the pain you place inside" and ask for release "from my dirty cage." Puddle Of Mudd sound like Saliva, Tantric and so many other bands.

  13. Dave Matthews Band-Everyday    (up 8 positions)      buy it!
    The Dave Matthews Band's Everyday CD isn't great but it does have quite a few decent ballads. The best ones keep things simple and relaxed. Everyday's title track is probably the best song on the record. Vocals by South African singer Vusi Mahlasela help create a joyful feel. Everyday shows off the band's strong musicianship. Backing vocals, guitar, horns and Carter Beauford's drums all contribute to Everday's light and playful but rich sound. Everyday's "all you need is love" refrain is nothing new but it fits a song about reducing things to the basics that advises us to "get your hands dirty" and seek love.

  14. Default-Wasting My Time    (up 2 positions)      buy it!
    It's depressing that, besides offering a watered down version of bands like Pearl Jam, Creed now seem to be inspiring a bunch of new, success hungry bands with their serious, literal minded rock. Wasting My Time, from the Fallout CD, is another overdone rock song. Dallas Smith has the requisite unnaturally deep, intense vocal. The Canadian band try to show that they're sensitive but can rock too. Wasting My Time is remarkably uninteresting, following the very familiar pattern of starting quietly with a meaningful guitar riff before letting the power chords crunch in on the chorus. The verses sound like With Arms Wide Open. The chorus is generic guitar rock. Wasting My Time's lyrics justify a breakup with a girlfriend.

  15. U2-Stuck In A Moment You Can't Get Out Of    (down 4 positions)      buy it!
    Nearly a year after reviewing All That You Can't Leave Behind, I'm sticking to my original opinion. The CD is quite mellow and can be a little slow but it's remarkably consistent with thoughtful, enjoyable songs. Especially after the band's showy 90s work, All That You Can't Leave Behind's modesty is very appealing. Bono restrains the excesses that sometimes obscure his gift. His vocals have a charming grace. As they do throughout the CD, producers Brian Eno and Daniel Lanois give Stuck In A Moment a warm, rich sound. The keyboards create the easy feel of an r&b classic like People Get Ready. The fact that Bono wrote this as a message he wished he had sent to his friend Michael Hutchence, before he killed himself, gives Stuck In A Moment added poignance.

  16. Pink-Get The Party Started    (up 7 positions)      buy it!
    Get The Party Started, from Pink's second CD M!ssundaztood, is a pleasant surprise. On the hits from her first CD, Pink showed a distinctive personality in her singing and videos but the music was fairly standard, if effective, contemporary dance pop. Linda Perry, whose band 4 Non Blondes had a big hit with What's Up, produced and cowrote Get The Party Started. I wasn't a big fan of What's Up, but she's done a great job on Get The Party Started helping Pink break genre walls with a big, loose 70s funk groove. Get The Party Started is reminiscent of the B-52's joyful invitations to the dance floor. Overdubbing on the chorus even makes Pink sound a little like she's both Kate Pierson and Cindy Wilson. Get The Party Started has Pink's standard narcissism. She brags about her Mercedes and gold diamond rings and loves the idea of a party where "everybody's waitin' for me to arrive" and "everybody's dancin' for me." Luckily the music, with its fun feel and big, thumping beat, has a more generous tone than the lyrics.

  17. Mick Jagger-God Gave Me Everything    (unchanged)      buy it!
    A few songs on Mick Jagger's Goddess In The Doorway CD go the Supernatural route with Mick hoping young musicians will give him good songs and renewed relevance. He even follows Santana in working with Wyclef Jean and Rob Thomas. Lenny Kravitz serves Mick well on God Gave Me Everything. Mick's vocal has the loose, frivolous feel of much of his late career work but Kravitz keeps him pretty well reigned in with a no nonsense, if not particularly memorable, song and arrangement. God Gave Me Everything has an exciting sound with a good, big beat and a driving guitar and bass line that evoke Gimme Shelter's thrills. The lyrics, delineating all the little blessing Mick appreciates, are basically jibberish, but God Gave Me Everything is still a lot of fun.

  18. Enrique Iglesias-Hero    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Hero, from Iglesias' Escape CD, is another song that's found a September 11 connection. Some TV stations used it with footage of World Trade Center rescuers and Iglesias sang it at one of the benefit shows. Hero is actually a sappy love song with Iglesias selflessly offering to be a romantic savior. Iglesias slowly and seriously intones the lyrics, sounding a little like he's pronouncing them phonetically. The music starts fairly minimally but builds to an unsubtle conclusion with big, sweeping strings. That said, Hero isn't as cheesy and synthetic sounding as much of Iglesias' English language work. It does what it's supposed to with emotional romance novel imagery of an exotic Latin lover that's bound to appeal to millions of women.

  19. Jewel-Standing Still    (up 3 positions)      buy it!
    I'm not a big fan of Jewel's ballads and their big image school girl poetry but at least her ballads seem heartfelt. Standing Still, the first single from the This Way CD, sounds like some record company guy's idea of a single. It's slick, empty lite rock. Since it's apparently modelled on early 70s Eagles style easy rock, Standing Still is, at least, fairly soothing and pleasant. But Jewel's thin, soulless quavering voice is ill suited to rock singing. The drummer and bass player try to create a little drama but the music stays pretty insipid. Jewel's lyric, agonizing whether a relationship is going anywhere, is, typically, slightly showy and overdone. It starts: "cuttin' through the darkest night in my two headlights." Couldn't you just say driving at night?

  20. Disturbed-Down With The Sickness    (down 1 position)      buy it!
    Even in the over the top world of troubled contemporary rockers, Disturbed seem pretty silly. Down With The Sickness is the third chart hit from their The Sickness CD. Down With The Sickness has rumbling, hammering guitars and a menacing atmosphere but it's not quite as hard as Disturbed's previous rock radio hits. The music is kept quiet and slow so you can pick up the ridiculous, dark lyrics about "drowning in my deep sea of loathing" and waking "the demon in me." On the chorus, David Draiman does the same angry, stuttering yell he did on Stupify and Voices.

  21. System Of A Down-Chop Suey    (down 1 position)      buy it!
    Finally, after so many serious, self pitying, soundalike bands have dominated rock radio, a hard rock band has a hit that sounds different and shows a sense of humor. With tough guitars and hardcore fast drums, Chop Suey, from the Toxicity CD, has the chops necessary to keep the headbangers happy but it's also refreshingly weird. Serj Tankian's over the top vocal takes Chop Suey all over the map, starting as a punk rant, slowing down for a meaningful croon that may be mocking his self important contemporaries("I don't think you trust in my self righteous suicide") and eventually shifting to a spacy, gothic conclusion.

  22. Mary J. Blige-Family Affair    (up 2 positions)      buy it!
    Family Affair, from Blige's No More Drama CD, is Blige's biggest pop hit so far and it deserves its success. It has one of the best grooves of the year. Dr Dre's production is quite brilliant. The music, with an easy, shuffling beat and good backing vocals and keyboards, is relaxed but substantial. Blige has established a "don't mess with me" image but on Family Affair she sounds like she's having a good time, advising us to "leave your situations at the door" and "get it crunk", which apparently has something to do with dancing and having fun. Blige's vocal skills are on display as she smoothly scats around the beat.

  23. Coldplay-Trouble    (up 3 positions)      buy it!
    Coldplay's Parachutes is a nice, good sounding record. Chris Martin's singing is appealing modest. Trouble, Parachutes' third chart hit, is a good example of Martin's unassuming charm. On Trouble, Martin apologizes for "all the stupid things I've done" swearing, "I never meant to do you wrong." Trouble's music is sweet and inobtrusive with a good piano, elegant line.

  24. Hoobastank-Crawling In The Dark    (up 6 positions)      buy it!
    Crawling In The Dark, from the L.A. band's self titled major label debut, is another song that sounds pieced together from other successful rock songs. It's got Korn style atmospheric guitar, a serious, troubled singer, big power chords and a vague Faith No More/Limp Bizkit style hip hop sensibility. But Crawling In The Dark also has good tempo shifts and it's more interesting than much of the similarly imitative music on rock radio. I like the way the song speeds up and gains energy on the chorus. Doug Robb keeps things from getting too draggy as he sings about "looking for the answer" and trying to find direction in life.

  25. Rob Zombie-Feel So Numb    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Feel So Numb, from Rob Zombie's The Sinister Urge CD, has Zombie's typically over the top sound. His music is so theatrical and goofy that I assume you're not supposed to take it completely seriously. Feel So Numb, with its big guitars, is a little more of a mainstream rock song than some of Zombie's work. Still, with its frantic industrial synths and beat and Zombie's maniacal wail, Feel So Numb's sound is still way larger than life. I assume Zombie's music is some sort of parody but I mostly don't get the joke and just find it abrasive. Feel So Numb is apparently a diatribe about the alienating nature of modern society.

Songs 26-50


Home | Movies | Music | Video Games | Songs
Amazon.com | AllPosters.com | Half.com | Columbia House | Netflix

Copyright © 1998-2002 All-Reviews.com
Privacy Policy |  Advertising Info |  Contact Us