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All-Reviews.com Top 50 Songs*:
for the 3rd week of April, 2001

*based on airplay at alternative, pop and rock radio stations a cross the nation (reviews by LarryG)

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  1. Lifehouse-Hanging By A Moment    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Hanging By A Moment is from the No Name Face CD. Lifehouse are another young band clearly showing their Pearl Jam and Nirvana influences. There's a similarity between Lifehouse and Creed, the most successful Pearl Jam soundalikes. But on Hanging By A Moment, Lifeboat are serious without Creed's bloated excess. Hanging By A Moment is a familiar sounding rock ballad but Jason Wade is appealingly sincere, singing about "falling even more in love" and "letting go of all I've held onto", "living for the only thing I know."

  2. Train-Drops Of Jupiter    (unchanged)      buy it!
    If The Black Crowes' Chris Robinson was in a really good mood and fronted an upbeat piano based Bruce Hornsby song like Mandolin Rain, it would sound a little like Drops Of Jupiter, the title track from Train's new CD. Like Meet Virginia, it's a tribute to a complicated lady but Drops Of Virginia is even more sunny than Train's first hit. Drops Of Jupiter has soaring strings and not much of an edge but it has good energy. It's hard to resist the positive vibe as Pat Monahan recites the attributes of a woman whose growth convinces him "there's time to change."

  3. Incubus-Drive    (up 1 position)      buy it!
    The third chart hit from the Make Yourself CD is my favorite Incubus single so far. As usual, Brandon Boyd's lyrics are pretty serious but they have an appealing vulnerability and modest optimism. Boyd sings about feeling "the fear of uncertainty" but finding he can stop it from taking control. Boyd's singing is also serious but not overly dramatic. The band and producer Scott Litt provide a likably simple musical setting based around acoustic guitar and light percussion.

  4. Coldplay-Yellow    (up 1 position)      buy it!
    Coldplay follow Travis as a successful British band that's aware of their harder alternative predecessors but choose a mild, polite image and make smooth, pleasant music. Yellow is a sweet love song, a tribute to a woman who makes the stars shine and a list of things he'd do for her. The sound, with strings and a steadily strummed electric guitar, is rich and inviting and becomes more dense and intense. Chris Martin's voice is vulnerable and yearning, like Radiohead's Thom Yorke's, but Martin's lacks eccentricity and anguish. Its unpretentious thinness has an appealing honesty.

  5. Dave Matthews Band-I Did It    (down 2 positions)      buy it!
    With Matthews singing about mixing up "a magic mushroom cloud of care", I Did It, from the Everyday CD, has a bit of the trippy feel of Don't Drink The Water from Before These Crowded Streets. Even more, it has the mischievous feel of What Would You Say with the normally mellow Matthews having a good time, urging those in love, "don't turn it down, turn it loud, let it build" and "spread the love you got." Matthews' debauched delivery is a little too cute but the mood is generally fun. The solid band keep things moving forward with steady, unshowy backing.

  6. Aerosmith-Jaded    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Aerosmith's new CD is called Just Push Play. Jaded vaguely resembles the much better Janie's Got A Gun. It's the kind of slick, commercial music Aerosmith's made since their late 80's comeback. Jaded is kind of dopey. The lyrics keep telling us she's jaded but don't find many interesting ways to say it. Steven Tyler's distinctive shriek wails fairly meaningless lines like "you think you're where it's at but is that where it's supposed to be?" Jaded is superficial but also catchy, well made and inoffensive. Aerosmith take no chances, throwing in lots of pleasing sounds from strings, rock guitar and a familiar "my my baby blue" chorus.

  7. Dido-Thank You    (up 1 position)      buy it!
    Dido's No Angel CD has become a huge hit nearly two years after its release. First, the atmospheric Here With Me slowly approached near hit status. Then, Eminem's use of a piece of Thank You on Stan brought attention. Now, Stan is out of the top 50 after four weeks on the chart and Thank You has easily topped its peak position. Like David Gray, another slow building success from Britain with an adult audience, Dido's charms are subtle. I find Dido's music less interesting than Gray's but No Angel does have a sleek appeal. The use of percussion and electronica effects is tasteful and minimal but it does give Thank You a good texture that makes it more than just easy listening. Dido's vocals are fluid and smart and add edge to the smooth sound. Thank You's lyrics about how "just to be with you is having the best day of my life" are sappy but Dido's story of a love that "reminds me that it's not so bad" even when everything seems to be going wrong, is sweet.

  8. U2-Walk On    (down 1 position)      buy it!
    Walk On, the second chart hit from All That You Can't Leave Behind, shows how U2 have returned to the sincerity and idealism of their 80's work but express it in a more subtle, mature way. Walk On is a tribute to Aung San Suu Kyi, who won the Nobel Peace Prize for her brave struggle against the repressive Burmese government. Bono's admiration is clear as he sings, "you could have flown away, a singing bird in an open cage who will only fly for freedom." But Walk On avoids the stridency of the band's early political songs. Bono's vocal is appealingly restrained. The music, with The Edge's glistening guitar line, has a quiet beauty as well as a solid Larry Mullen beat.

  9. Fuel-Hemorrhage    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Fuel broke through with Shimmer, from their Sunburn CD. That song had a hard rock sound and was catchy but didn't seem too gimmicky. Hemorrhage, from the new Something Like Human CD, doesn't have Shimmer's light touch. With its dramatic strings and acoustic guitar, Hemorrhage is calculated to be a smash hit rock ballad. Brett Scallions is ever so intense as he sings Carl Bell's bombastic lyrics asking her not to leave love bleeding in my his hands, as if Elton John and many others hadn't thought of the image before.

  10. Crazy Town-Butterfly    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Butterfly is from the The Gift Of Game CD. Like Red Hot Chili Peppers, Crazy Town are a relaxed L.A. band familiar with hip hop and punk. Butterfly is knowingly stupid dance pop. It has a little of the vibe of Folk Implosion's Natural One and Sublime's What I Got. The song has an easy mood and a rapped string of cliches praising the positive effects of a woman, including "it doesn't get better than this", "I see the sun break through the dark clouds", "you showed me life is precious" and "I was lost, now I'm found."

  11. Aaron Lewis and Fred Durst-Outside    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Outside is the bonus track on the 1999 Family Values Tour CD. Limp Bizkit's Fred Durst "discovered" the band Staind early in their career and produced their 1999 Dysfunction CD. Dysfunction had two rock radio hits: the power ballad Home and the intense rocker Mudshovel. Both songs had Aaron Lewis' intense vocals and lyrics about his troubled mind. Outside is a duet between Lewis and Durst. The acoustic guitar backing is appealing but Lewis' vocals are again a little overwrought as he sings that the person who torments him is screwed up inside, just like he is.

  12. Moby-South Side    (unchanged)      buy it!
    So many songs on Moby's Play CD, beyond being great dance songs, are brilliant little works of art. More than 1˝years after its release, new people are still learning how great Play is. South Side, the 7th single from Play, is Moby's biggest hit yet. South Side has been remixed as a duet with No Doubt's Gwen Stefani. Her vocals give the new version a slicker, less menacing feel than the edgy album version. Even on the original, Moby's quavering falsetto on the chorus made it hard to believe him as a tough guy out with his boys, prepared for a gun fight and hoping "we won't die." Still, his slicing guitar, moody synths and tough beat create a good, foreboding atmosphere.

  13. Fuel-Innocent    (unchanged)      buy it!
    The promise of Fuel's last CD, Sunburn, is unfulfilled as they follow the first single from the Something Like Human CD, the ever so intense power ballad Hemorrhage, with the even less interesting musically and more commercially calculated Innocent. The lyrics are self pitying garbage. Singer Brett Scallions sings of a complicated life with "smiles all confiscated", complaining that "when we were innocent", "never were we told we'd be bought and sold." Innocent has many of the standard, contrived elements of a hit rock ballad. It starts with meaningfully strummed acoustics and builds with tasteful drums and soaring guitars while Scallions strains to show emotion.

  14. Tantric-Breakdown    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Frontman Travis Meeks fired the rest of Days Of The New, guitarist Todd Whitener, bassist Jesse Vest and drummer Matt Taul, before recording Days Of The New's second CD. Since then Days Of The New II sold disappointingly and Meeks' ex-bandmates are doing pretty well with their new band Tantric and their self titled CD. On Breakdown, the Louisville band create a potent, well produced sound with power chords, a big beat and a touch of synths. But the vocalist they chose, Hugo Ferreira, is just another intense, mannered overwrought rock singer. And the lyrics are fairly pointless, taunting someone who seems "to have it all", "to have control" who's losing it and trying to "find the reason that no one else is living this way."

  15. Janet Jackson-All For You    (up 2 positions)      buy it!
    With the often used riff from Chic's Good Times as its base, the title track from Janet Jackson's All For You CD has the feel of light, easy early 80's disco like Diana Ross' Upside Down. It has a taste of Jackson's Escapade and even Kool & The Gang's Celebration. I preferred Jackson's image before she became an ever smiling good girl and sometimes her singing on All For You is too sickly sweet. Mostly, she has a fluidity similar to her brother's. The lyrics encouraging a guy to "be yourself", "come on talk to me" and "tell me I'm the only one", promising "I'll let you sit right next to me" seem unlikely but, with the exception of silly, harder beats towards the end, All For You goes down pretty easily.

  16. Three Doors Down-Duck And Run    (unchanged)      buy it!
    Kryptonite was insinuating and distinctive but the rest of This Better Life is fairly routine rock. Three Doors Down don't have the nasty edge of some of their contemporaries but they sound like Candlebox and many other young rock bands. Duck and Run, like Loser, is sturdy but uninteresting. It's the hardest of their radio songs, with big, familiar power chords. As on the band's other chart hits, Brad Arnold seriously sings about the problems he's going through. He mostly avoids self pity but Duck and Run is a fairly standard angry young man screed about an uncaring world. Arnold doesn't clarify what he won't duck and run from or why "all my work and endless measures never seem to get me very far."

  17. Staind-It's Been Awhile    (up 11 positions)      buy it!
    It's Been Awhile, the first single from the Break The Cycle CD, entered the top 50 as singer Aaron Lewis had just made the top 10 for the first time with Outside from the Family Values Tour CD. It's Been Awhile is similar to Outside: thoughtful and fairly subtle for radio rock but very serious and not much fun. It's Been Awhile is another song about Lewis' troubled mind. He sings about how he always screws things and longs for the feeling of relief that came with his love. It's Been Awhile's verses are fairly quiet and similar to Outside. Power chords and drums create rock drama on the chorus but things don't get too overdone.

  18. American Hi-Fi-Flavor Of The Weak    (up 6 positions)      buy it!
    American Hi-Fi are another band like Presidents of the USA and Weezer with a fondness for fun, somewhat silly rocking pop artists from the late 70s like The Knack, Kiss and Pat Benatar. Flavor Of The Weak, from the band's self title debut CD is a good time with a simple sound and big power chords. The lyrics are appropriately basic. A teen wishes he could make his unrequited love see that her boyfriend "don't know anything about her, he's too stoned" and that he'll soon dump her.

  19. Limp Bizkit-My Way    (unchanged)      buy it!
    My Way is the third chart hit from Chocolate Starfish and the Hot Dog Flavored Water. It sounds like Rearranged, Take A Look Around and a lot of Limp Bizkit's other music. The music, though familiar, is pretty good with an edgy, forboding mood on the verses and good rock energy on the chorus from Wes Borland's fast, hard guitar and John Otto's dynamic beat. But, as usual, Fred Durst messes things up with his mediocre talent and stupid attitude. Durst's thin voice is barely adequate on the verses then he does his distinctive hoarse yelp on the chorus. The lyrics are a typical paranoid Durst rant similar to Rearranged's. He resents a woman looking down on him, pathetically demands respect("it's my way or the highway") and convinces himself "you'll be the one who's left missing me."

  20. Uncle Kracker-Follow Me    (down 5 positions)      buy it!
    Uncle Kracker(aka Matt Shafer) was Kid Rock's DJ. He co-wrote some of the hits from Devil Without A Cause and Kid Rock produced Uncle Kracker's Double Wide CD. Sugar Ray lead singer Mark McGrath appears in the Follow Me video. Like Sugar Ray did on their pop hits Someday and Falls Apart, Uncle Kracker restrains his harder dance music instincts on Follow Me. Uncle Kracker seems more calculated and less sincere but Follow Me has an undeniable appeal. Follow Me has a doo wop feel and good, very minimal instrumentation from fingersnaps and light drumming and keyboards. Follow Me is pleasant and innocuous though its lyric is fairly annoying. Uncle Kracker tries to convince his girl that a lack of commitment is good("We'll be alright if you don't ask me to stay") and boasts, "I make you feel free" and"I can guarantee, you won't find nobody else like me."

  21. Shaggy-Angel    (down 3 positions)      buy it!
    A song with Shaggy thanking a girl, to the tune of Angel Of The Morning, for giving her love, over a riff copped for Steve Miller's The Joker, is not promising. However, as on the silly, very un-politically correct It Wasn't Me, Shaggy's charm overcomes a lot. Shaggy's cocky even when he's supposed to be humble("I called and you heeded, mission completed") and it's hard to believe him suddenly realizing his girl should be treated like a queen but his confident, deep Jamaican rap and easy charm("she was there through my incarceration, I wanna show the nation my appreciation") explains why women would want to believe him. As on It Wasn't Me, Angel wisely pairs Shaggy with a smoother singer though Rayvon's Angel Of The Morning chorus is sickly sweet. Angel, from the Hotshot CD, has a clear sound with a strong, steady beat and the Joker riff works pretty well.

  22. Oleander-Are You There?    (down 1 position)      buy it!
    Are You There?, from the California band's Unwind CD, is fairly standard radio rock. It starts with very, big angry guitars then settles into familiar power chords augmented by a weird electronic effect. Thomas Flowers isn't a tough rock and roll singer like some of his peers. His voice is kind of thin. The lyric isn't as obnoxious as in some contemporary rock. Flowers is vulnerable, singing about needing support "when I feel too far away from where I want to be" and wondering if there's anybody there "who doesn't just pretend to care ."

  23. Destiny's Child-Survivor    (up 2 positions)      buy it!
    It's hard to argue with the premise of the title track of Destiny's Child's new CD. The group's history has been like a version of the TV show. Members have been regularly booted and Kelly Rowland and leader Beyonce Knowles have emerged as tough, very wealthy survivors. I like the way Knowles' voice twists around the cheesy synth string effects but the song's unrelenting torrent of self assurance is exhausting. As on Independent Women, the boasts about success become mean taunts. The lyrics specify the many ways "now that you're out of my life I'm so much better", mocking the unnamed person who thought she'd be weak, broke, scared and helpless with the facts that she's wise, tougher and, most importantly, has sold nine million. The women claim they're better than compromising their christianity by dissing the person in interviews or on the internet but apparently doing so in a hit song is OK.

  24. Eric Clapton-Superman Inside    (down 2 positions)      buy it!
    I'm indifferent to Clapton's new age lyric about "gettin' closer to peace of mind" and finding the Superman inside but his "need to let it out" is matched in the music's buoyant mood. The new Reptile CD has good musicians including Billy Preston and Paul Carrack on keyboards. Superman Inside has the kind of loose, rollicking piano Preston did for the Rolling Stones. Clapton's recent singles have been so mellow and serious that it's good he's doing the kind of fun song he hasn't done much since Forever Man. Superman Inside has a big sound with slide guitar, backing vocals and Clapton confident's lead.

  25. Lenny Kravitz-Again    (down 5 positions)      buy it!
    It's galling to me that someone's decided that Lenny Kravitz's uninspired Hendrix and Sly Stone retreads deserve a greatest hits CD. Still, this new song isn't as annoying as most of his work. It has a nice groove with a good bass and drums high in the mix. Kravitz' vocals are typically complacent and his lyrics are pretty terrible as he sings about hearing a cry in his soul and about never having "a yearning quite like this before" and wondering if he'll ever see his "sacred gift of heaven" again. Kravitz also pulls off an awful, cliched rock guitar solo in the middle. However, while Again is pretty insubstantial, it has a appealingly easy mood.

Songs 26-50


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